Bergamin Bookstore & More

We don’t let “Bullshit” conquer the world!

Populair books by genre

  • Rebooting Clausewitz

    Christopher Coker

    Rebooting Clausewitz offers an entirely new take on the work of history’s greatest theorist of war. Written for an undergraduate readership that often struggles with Clausewitz’s master work On War — a book that is often considered too philosophical and impenetrably dense — it seeks to unpack some of Clausewitz’s key insights on theory and strategy. In three fictional interludes Clausewitz attends a seminar at West Point; debates the War on Terror at a Washington thinktank; and takes part in a heated discussion on the value of reading history at a meeting of the Military History Circle in London. Three separate essays situate Clausewitz in the context of his times, discuss his understanding of the culture of war, and the extent to which two other giants — Thucydides and Sun Tzu — complement his work.

    Some years ago the philosopher W. B. Gallie argued that Clausewitz needed to be ‘saved from the Clausewitzians’. Clausewitz doesn’t need saving and his commentators have contributed a great deal to our understanding of On War’s seminal status as a text. But too often they hold a discussion between themselves. This book is an attempt to let a wider audience into the conversation.

    Author

    Christopher Coker is Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics. He is author of, among others, Warrior Geeks: How 21st Century Technology is Changing the Way We Fight and Think About War, and Rebooting Clausewitz: ‘On War’ in the Twenty-First Century.

    Reviews

    ‘Christopher Coker answers the question of Clausewitz’s relevance to the twenty-first Century by imagining the great master justifying his theories to modern audiences. His approach is engaging, illuminating and a bit mischievous.’ — Sir Lawrence Freedman, Emeritus Professor of War Studies, King’s College London, author of Strategy: A History

    ‘Is Clausewitz still relevant for the twenty first century? In this bravura and scintillatingly written study, Christopher Coker argues for a powerful yes. Mixing acute analysis and thought provoking imagined dialogues and fictional recreations of Clausewitz’s discussion with his friends, Coker has produced a gem of a book, illuminating brilliantly for the twenty first century the originality and genius of both Clausewitz and On War.’ — Nicholas Rengger, Professor of Political Theory and International Relations, University of St Andrews

    An evocative and entertaining excursion that reveals not only what Coker thinks about Clausewitz, but also what he thinks about several of the leading institutions that help shape strategic thinking in the US and UK today. — Antulio J. Echevarria II, Elihu Root Chair of Military Studies, US Army War College

    ‘Arguing about Clausewitz remains a vital exercise in thinking about conflict. Coker’s study will help students grasp his main concepts, and to argue afresh over the Prussian’s ideas, life and legacy, and the conflicting ways to interpret his work. Clausewitz’s mind was restless and argumentative, and Coker imagines him intervening in the debates of our time. Coker, like Bassford, Herberg-Rothe, Paret and Strachan helps bring Clausewitz back from stale doctrinal arguments, as a source of wisdom in times of war.’ — Patrick Porter, Professor of Strategic Studies, University of Exeter, and author of The Global Village Myth: Distance, War and the Limits of Power

    Paperback
    April 2017 • 9781849047142 • 192pp

    19,95
  • Landscapes of the Jihad

    Faisal Devji

     

     

    The militant Islam represented by Al-Qaeda is often described as a global movement. Apart from the geographical range of its operations and support, little else is held to define it as ‘global’.

    Landscapes of the Jihad explores the features that Al-Qaeda and other strands of militant Islam share in common with global movements. These include a decentralised organisation and an emphasis on ethical rather than properly political action. Devji brings these and other characteristics of Al-Qaeda together in an analysis of the jihad that locates it squarely within the transformation of political thought after the Cold War. The jihad emerges from the breakdown of traditional as well as modern forms of authority in the Muslim world. It is neither dogmatic in an old-fashioned way nor ideological in the modern sense, and concerned neither with correct doctrinal practice in the present nor with some revolutionary utopia of the future. Instead it is fragmented, dispersed and highly individualistic.

    Author

    Faisal Devji is Reader in Modern South Asian History and Fellow of St. Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. He is the author of, inter alia, Muslim Zion: Pakistan as a Political Idea and The Impossible Indian: Gandhi and the Temptations of Violence.

    Reviews

    ‘No political theorist, anthropologist or student of Islam will fail to be provoked and inspired by this brilliant analysis of jihadi discourse. […] Devji moves effortlessly between theology, history and cultural studies to give us the first major English-language interpretation of the moral world of contemporary jihad.’ — Professor Arjun Appadurai, New School University

    ‘Devji’s very original book analyses Al Qaeda and jihad in metaphysical terms, discarding geo-strategic and cultural factors, [hence] the West is also presented as a metaphysical entity. Globalization is thus not linked to strategy, territory or culture. The concept of landscape summarises his approach: action creates its own landscape and is not the expression of an pre-existing cultural, territorial or strategic divide. Hence there emerge different ‘landscapes’: of jihad, of mysticism, of media and of film, all of which combine with each other. […] Devji’s original analysis of the writings of Osama bin Laden and Ayman Al-Zawahiri is very illuminating and substantiates his iconoclastic approach.’ —Professor Olivier Roy, author, Globalised Islam: The Search for a New Ummah

    ‘One of the most intelligent analyses of the world-view of the militant Islamist.’ — The New Statesman

    ‘A brilliant long essay on the ethical underpinnings of modern jihad … Martyrdom, observes Devji rightly, “only achieves meaning by being witnessed by the media.” It is, short, a horrendous form of advertising.’ — New York Review of Books

    ‘Devji’s Landscapes of the Jihad examines the vitality of militant movements, arguing that in a global society, organizations like al-Qaeda have gathered meaning and strength in an “institutional vacuum” … Devji rejects the traditional scholarship that roots it in regional issues like the Palestinian cause and poverty and oppression. Most controversially, he equates militant Islam with “the plethora of non-governmental agencies dedicated to humanitarian work”. He also concludes, more conventionally, that the U.S. response to militant Islam — the “global war on terror” — has transformed war “into a species of policing”.’ — Publishers Weekly 

    The Terrorist in Search of Humanity is in many ways a sequel to Devji’s equally provocative 2005 book, Landscapes of the Jihad. Al Qaeda’s importance in the long run, Devji writes, lies not in its pioneering a new form of networked militancy … but instead in its fragmentation of traditional structures of Muslim authority within new global landscapes … it is a measure of Devji’s seriousness, and his unfailingly original turn of mind, that one waits impatiently for his next provocation.’ — The National

    ‘I enjoyed Landscapes Of The Jihad, in which Devji points out just how deeply unorthodox a Muslim Bin Laden is — not just in his espousal of indiscriminate violence but also his cult of martyrs and frequent talk of dream and visions, all of which derive from popular, mystical and Shia Islamic traditions, against which the orthodox has long struggled.’ — William Dalrymple, Sunday Herald

    Landscapes of the Jihad is very short, closely and narrowly focused, thought-provoking, and elegantly written … One refreshing aspect of Devji’s book is that it leans heavily on evidence from an area often neglected by scholars writing about Islam — the Indian subcontinent and Afghanistan.’ — Carole Hillenbrand, Times Literary Supplement

    ‘Do not approach this challenging essay … expecting a familiar narrative of al-Qaeda and its founder, or of the eponymous “war on terror”. Devji dispenses with conventional analysis and with much that is regarded as received wisdom … Devji describes how jihad has subordinated the local to the global. He plays down its Middle Eastern origins and he stresses its diverse sources (Shia and Sufi as well as Sunni) as well as its heterodox innovations. Bin Laden’s transformation of jihad, for example, from a collective to an individual duty, is a radical departure from the classical Islamic tradition. But how else could a global movement operate in a post-modern world where Muslims are moved to applause or to action by some spectacular act of violence, which they see on a television or computer screen? Conventional forms of top-down recruitment and mobilisation are, it seems, as passé as conventional politics … Landscapes of the Jihad is, in its unconventional thinking, an oasis in the wearisome desert of al-Qaeda studies. It is, in the best possible sense, subversive.’ — The Economist

    Paperback
    April 2017 • 9781849047203 • 200pp

    16,00
  • Victorian Muslim

    Jamie Gilham & Ron Geaves

     

    After formally announcing his conversion to Islam in the late 1880s, the Liverpool lawyer William Henry Abdullah Quilliam publicly propagated his new faith and established the first community of Muslim converts in Victorian Britain. Despite decades of relative obscurity following his death, with the resurgence of interest in Muslim heritage in the West since 9/11 Quilliam has achieved iconic status in Britain and beyond as a pivotal figure in the history of Western Islam and Muslim–Christian relations.

    In this timely book, leading experts of the religion, history and politics of Islam offer new perspectives and shed fresh light on Quilliam’s life and work. Through a series of original essays, the authors critically examine Quilliam’s influences, philosophy and outlook, the significance of his work for Islam, his position in the Muslim world and his legacy. Collectively, the authors ask pertinent questions about how conversion to Islam was viewed and received historically, and how a zealous convert like Quilliam negotiated his religious and national identities and sought to indigenise Islam in a non-Muslim country.

    Author

    Jamie Gilham is Honorary Research Associate in the Department of History at Royal Holloway, University of London. He is the author of Loyal Enemies: British Converts to Islam, 1850-1950.

    Ron Geaves is Visiting Professor in the Department of History, Archaeology and Religion, based in the Centre for the Study of Islam in the UK at Cardiff University. He is the author of Islam in Victorian Britain: The Life and Times of Abdullah Quilliam, along with other books on contemporary Islam.

    Reviews

    This book reflects the rich and rewarding outcomes that arise when two established scholars – building on their earlier research – go on to assemble a group of eminent and authoritative scholars who write about a subject – or rather a person – of both historic and contemporary significance.  This accomplished project has resulted in an illuminating and masterful volume that makes an important contribution to the study of Muslims in Britain, past and present.’ — Sophie Gilliat-Ray, Professor of Religious Studies and Director of the Islam-UK Centre, Cardiff University

    ‘This is a timely collection of essays exploring the life and legacy of the Victorian British Muslim, Abdullah (William) Quilliam. In these essays, historical analyses and contemporary concerns coalesce to inform discussion about the compatibility of Islam and British values and traditions. The volume resists offering easy answers or minimizing the complexities involved in the current debate on pluralism, belonging and identity.’ — Clinton Bennett, State University of New York at New Paltz, and author of Victorian Images of Islam

    Paperback
    April 2017 • 9781849047043 • 224pp

    29,95
  • Jihad and Death

    Olivier Roy

    How has ISIS been able to muster support far beyond its initial constituency in the Arab world and attract tens of thousands of foreign volunteers, including converts to Islam, and seemingly countless supporters online? In this compelling intervention into the debate about ISIS’ origins and future prospects, the renowned French sociologist, Olivier Roy, argues that while terrorism and jihadism are familiar phenomena, the deliberate pursuit of death has produced a new kind of radical violence. In other words, we’re facing not a radicalization of Islam, but the Islamization of radicalism.

    Jihad and Death is a concise dissection of the highly sophisticated narrative mobilised by ISIS: the myth of the Caliphate recast into a modern story of heroism and nihilism. According to Roy, this very contemporary aesthetic of violence is less rooted in the history of Islamic thought than it is entrenched in a youth culture that has turned global and violent.

    Author

    Olivier Roy is one of the most distinguished analysts of and commentators on political Islam in the Middle East and Central Asia. The author of several highly acclaimed books, four of which are published by Hurst, he is Professor at the European University Institute in Florence.

    Olivier Roy’s work has always been both provocative and informative. This book is no exception; Roy provides readers with new scholarly insights into violence, its modern jihadi aesthetic, and “radicalisation” and its relationship to Islam. Whatever your opinion, this book will make you think, and think again. Without question, an essential contribution. — Tariq Ramadan

    ‘Roy’s brisk work is full of imaginative leaps, and that is what gives it value. There has been too much circular writing about the “mind of the terrorist”, too many assumptions about their supposed brainwashing. By examining the significance of death for these jihadists, he can dismantle their manifold confusions.’ — The Times

    ‘Olivier Roy is one of the most interestingly provocative thinkers on modern jihadism. In this excellent short book, the French academic reiterates his argument that we are seeing not “the radicalisation of Islam but the Islamisation of radicalism.”’ — Prospect

    ‘For three decades, Oliver Roy has pioneered innovative and insightful research on religion and politics in Islam and beyond. Equipped with analytical depth, historical sensitivity and a comparative lens, this book brings the analysis of jihad and death in the current radicalism to a new level. This is a must read for anyone who wants to understand the Islamization of radicalism.’ — Asef Bayat, Catherine and Bruce Bastian Professor of Global and Transnational Studies and Professor of Sociology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    ‘This is another extraordinary work from a master scholar of Muslim politics. Taking conventional wisdom head-on, Olivier Roy clinically unpacks the supposed relationship between religion and radicalisation. He tellingly warns us that all the attention on the caliphal pretensions of ISIS obscures the core challenges of nihilism, generational revolt, and a radical repudiation of social norms.’ — James Piscatori, Professor at the Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies, Australian National University, and co-author of Muslim Politics

    ‘Olivier Roy is widely respected for his decades-long research into radical Islam. More interested in actual processes than in opportunistic concepts, he describes in Jihad and Death how the self-proclaimed Islamic State plays more on its enemies’ fears than on its own strength. A very welcome and eye-opening intervention.’ — Jean-Pierre Filiu, Professor at the Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) and author of From Deep State to Islamic State

    ‘With Jihad and Death, Olivier Roy offers his contribution to the ongoing debate on jihadism and its causes, and advocates for a comparative sociological approach focused on the motivations of individual actors rather than grand theological debates. The result is deeply insightful, thought-provoking and deserves to be widely read.’ — Stéphane Lacroix, Associate Professor of Political Science, Sciences-Po, and author of Awakening Islam

    Hardback
    April 2017 • 9781849046985 • 136pp

    19,95
  • Rebel Law

    Frank Ledwidge

     

    In most societies, courts are where the rubber of government meets the road of the people. If a state cannot settle disputes and enforce its decisions, to all intents and purposes it is no longer in charge. This is why successful rebels put courts and justice at the top of their agendas. Rebel Law explores this key weapon in the arsenal of insurgent groups, from the IRA’s ‘Republican Tribunals’ of the 1920s to Islamic State’s ‘Caliphate of Law’, via the ALN in Algeria of the ‘50s and 60s and the Afghan Taliban of recent years.

    Frank Ledwidge delineates the battle in such ungoverned spaces between counterinsurgents seeking to retain the initiative and the insurgent courts undermining them. Contrasting colonial judicial strategy with the chaos of stabilisation operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, he offers compelling lessons for today’s conflicts.

    Author

    Frank Ledwidge is a former barrister and military intelligence officer who served in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya. His books include Losing Small Wars: British Military Failure in Iraq and Afghanistan (2011) and Investment in Blood: The True Cost of Britain’s Afghan War (2013).

    Reviews

    ‘As a former justice advisor for the UK military mission in Afghanistan, Ledwidge brings a uniquely well-informed perspective to the issues of using legal processes to achieve military objectives by both insurgents and counterinsurgents at the operational and tactical level. He argues that the ability of insurgents to offer “fair” judicial process — particularly dispute resolution — has proved critical to successful state-building by insurgent groups. On the flipside, Ledwidge contends that counterinsurgency strategy must employ “legal pluralism” to develop an effective judicial strategy. Cogently written and forcefully argued, Rebel Law will be of interest to military professionals, legal scholars and policy makers alike.’ — Montgomery McFate, Professor at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, and author of Military Anthropology: Soldiers, Scholars and Subjects at the Margins of Empire

    ‘Frank Ledwidge builds a compelling case for the monopoly of justice in determining the outcome of insurgencies. Drawing upon years of experience and scholarship, Ledwidge convincingly argues that nowhere is the contest for control of a population, the delicate interplay between consent and coercion, expressed with greater impact than in the competing legal systems offered by insurgent and counter-insurgent.’ — Edward Burke, Lecturer in Strategic Studies, The University of Portsmouth, Royal Air Force College Cranwell

    ‘This book is an essential resource for scholars and practitioners concerned with the operation of legal systems during and after conflict. Frank Ledwidge offers a unique perspective on the complex interactions between state and insurgent judiciaries that is informed by years of fieldwork and service as a justice advisor in warscapes including Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya.’ — Mara Revkin, Department of Political Science, Yale University

    ‘In the literature on counterinsurgency no concepts are more frequently invoked or more poorly understood than legitimacy, justice, and law. Insurgencies win by out-governing the status quo power and the primary thrust of their strategy is nearly always the provision of alternative justice to populations hungry for better law. Frank Ledwidge’s brilliant book plugs the gap in the literature commendably. It is indispensable reading.’ — David Betz, Professor of War in the Modern World, Department of War Studies, King’s College London

    ‘A ground-breaking picture of the role of law in (particularly, irregular) warfare: so-called lawfare. This highly readable study opens up a new vista in counterinsurgency and underlines the centrality therein of properly-delivered, culturally-specific justice. A fascinating tour de force that demands to be read by politicians and generals alike.’ —  Mike Martin, author of An Intimate War: An Oral History of the Helmand Conflict

    Hardback
    April 2017 • 9781849047982 • 256pp

    30,00
  • Jihad van liefde

    Mohamed El Bachiri

    Mohamed El Bachiri is een Marokkaanse Belg, moslim en Molenbekenaar. Hij is ook de man van Loubna Lafquiri, zijn grote liefde en moeder van zijn kinderen, die op 22 maart 2016 bij de aanslagen in Brussel om het leven is gekomen. Zijn liefdevolle speech in het tv-programma De Afspraak eind december beroerde miljoenen en werd het meest bekeken filmpje ooit op de Vlaamse televisie. El Bachiri riep mensen op elkaar te begrijpen en empathie te tonen. „Ik heb het over een jihad die geen haat kent“, aldus de Marokkaanse Belg. „Een jihad die aanzet om naar de ander te gaan, de broeder die anders is, om hem toe te lachen, te begrijpen en empathie te tonen. Deze jihad zou het antwoord moeten zijn op zij die verdeeldheid willen zaaien en geweld en terrorisme propageren.”

    Ik ben een jihadist van de liefde. Vraag me niet om te haten, nog liever zou ik sterven!

    In Een jihad van liefde – opgetekend door David Van Reybrouck – praat Mohamed over zijn jeugd in Molenbeek, de liefde voor zijn vrouw en zijn leven na de aanslagen. Als eerbetoon aan zijn vrouw buigt Mohamed het leed dat hem is aangedaan op moedige en veerkrachtige wijze om in een boodschap van liefde en medemenselijkheid, waarbij hij westerse moslims oproept tot een meer humanistische benadering van de islam. Het resultaat is een sobere tekst van een ongelooflijke wijsheid.
    Author

    David Van Reybrouck (1971) is cultuurhistoricus, archeoloog en schrijver van non-fictie, theater en poëzie. Voor Congo ontving hij de Libris Geschiedenisprijs, de AKO Literatuurprijs, de J. Greshoff-prijs en de Prix Médicis 2012. In 2014 ontving hij de Gouden Ganzenveer. In datzelfde jaar werd Tegen verkiezingen bekroond met de Henriëtte Roland Holst-prijs.

    9789023471622 /paperback

     

     

    7,99
  • Balochistan, the British and the Great Game

    Heathcote, T. A.

    The Great Game for Central Asia led to British involvement in Balochistan, a sparsely-populated area in Pakistan, mostly desert and mountain, and containing the Bolan Pass, the southern counterpart of the more famous Khyber. It occupies a position of great strategic importance between Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran and the Arabian Sea.

    Heathcote’s book is a history of the Khanate of Kalat and of British operations against the Baloch hill tribes who raided frontier settlements and the Bolan caravans. Its themes include rivalry between British officials in Sind and the Punjab, high profile disputes between British politicians over frontier policy and organisation, and the British occupation of Quetta, guardian city of the Bolan, in the run-up to the Second Afghan War. Among the many strong characters in this story is Sir Robert Sandeman, hitherto hailed as ‘the peaceful conqueror of Balochistan’, now revealed as a ruthless careerist, whose personal ambitions led to the fragmentation of the country under British domination. The closing chapter summarises subsequent events up to modern times, in which the Baloch have maintained a long-running struggle for greater autonomy within Pakistan.

    Author

    A. Heathcote studied history at SOAS, London, from where he joined the National Army Museum. He later transferred to the RMA Sandhurst, where he was for many years the Curator.

    Reviews

    ‘This book comprehensively details the greater Balochistan area, its place in the strategic Great Game, and the interesting role played by British officials there. It enhances our understanding of this still volatile and important region and is a “must read” for those wanting to know about Balochistan’s history in depth.’ — Christopher Snedden, Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, Honolulu, and author of Understanding Kashmir and Kashmiris

    ‘Tony Heathcote, the author of several distinguished works on the British military in India, brings a wealth of expertise to this study of the “Great Game”. He tells a fascinating story that needs to be read by anyone who seeks to understand an area that remains, to this day, strategically vital.’ — Gary Sheffield, Professor of War Studies, University of Wolverhampton

    ‘Heathcote’s impressive archival research and encyclopaedic understanding of this complex region yields a fascinating narrative from a long-ignored chapter of Britain’s colonial enterprise in South Asia. For scholars, students and general readers alike, the story of Balochistan’s role in the game of Empire and its colourful central characters proves engaging, enlightening and — above all — entertaining.’ — Willem Marx, journalist and author of Balochistan at a Crossroads

    30,00
  • Citizen Hariri

    Baumann, Hannes

    Rafiq Hariri was Lebanon’s Silvio Berlusconi: a ‘self-made’ billionaire who became prime minister and shaped postwar reconstruction. His assassination in February 2005 almost tipped the country into civil strife. Yet Hariri was neither a militia leader nor from a traditional political family. How did this outsider rise to wield such immense political and economic power?

    Citizen Hariri shows how the billionaire converted his wealth and close ties to the Saudi monarchy into political power. Hariri is used as a prism to examine how changes in global neoliberalism reshaped Lebanese politics. He initiated urban megaprojects and inflated the banking sector. And having grown rich as a contractor in the Gulf, he turned Lebanon into an outlet for Gulf capital. The concentration of wealth and the restructuring of the postwar Lebanese state were comparable to the effects of neoliberalism elsewhere. But at the same time, Hariri was a deeply Lebanese figure. He had to fend against militia leaders and a hostile Syrian regime. The billionaire outsider eventually came to behave like a traditional Lebanese political patron. Hannes Baumnann assesses not only the personal legacy of the man dubbed ‘Mr Lebanon’ but charts the wider social and economic transformations his rise represented.

    Author
    Hannes Baumann is a lecturer at the University of Liverpool. His current research looks at the politics of Gulf investment in non-oil Arab states. He previously taught or researched at King’s College London, Georgetown University, the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

    Reviews

    ‘Baumann provides a brilliant study of the neoliberal reconstruction in post-war Lebanon by an oligarchy of warlords, bankers and contractors, who subordinated the state to private interests and enriched themselves on rent extraction, increasing unemployment, poverty and social inequalities.’ — Fawwaz Traboulsi, author of A History of Modern Lebanon

    ‘A masterly account of the introduction of neoliberalism in Lebanon. Combining sociological and economic analysis, Citizen Hariri provides a fresh look at clientelism, governance, class formation, and the state in Lebanon. It will be a key work for years to come.’ — Sune Haugbølle, Associate Professor at Roskilde University, and author of War and Memory in Lebanon

    ‘This insightful and clever book justifiably puts political economy at the center of the analysis, but also exposes the ways in which Hariri’s engagement in politics fueled an increasingly “sectarian” emphasis as he sought power in Lebanon’s power-sharing system. The careful exposition of large-scale state interference with property rights and currency markets is an important contribution.’ — Melani Cammett, Professor of Government, Harvard University, and author of Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon

    Citizen Hariri not only provides us with a critical biography of one of the modern Middle East’s most fascinating political figures, it also throws new light on state–business relations and the politics of economic reforms in the wider region.’ — Steffen Hertog, Associate Professor, London School of Economics and Political Science, and co-editor of Business Politics in the Middle East

    ‘An insightful, sharp and timely analysis of Hariri. This is an invaluable contribution that sheds light on contemporary politics in Lebanon, and a must-read for all those interested in the post-civil war era.’ — Mayssoun Sukarieh, Lecturer in Middle Eastern Studies, King’s College London and co-author of Youth Rising? The Politics of Youth in the Global Economy

    ‘Citizen Hariri is the first head-on, comprehensive inquiry into Lebanon’s turn to “neoliberalism”; much rejected and despaired, but rarely analysed as powerfully as here. No other book so compellingly brings to life Mister Lebanon, the country’s turbulent politics, and the predicament of being ruled and governed by “real existing neoliberalism”.’ — Reinoud Leenders, King’s College London, author of Spoils of Truce – Corruption and State-Building in Postwar Lebanon

     

    40,00
  • Colonial Lahore

    Tahir Kamran

    A number of studies of colonial Lahore in recent years have explored such themes as the city’s modernity, its cosmopolitanism and the rise of communalism which culminated in the bloodletting of 1947. This first synoptic history moves away from the prism of the Great Divide of 1947 to examine the cultural and social connections which linked colonial Lahore with North India and beyond. In contrast to portrayals of Lahore as inward looking and a world unto itself, the authors argue that imperial globalisation intensified long established exchanges of goods, people and ideas.

    Ian Talbot and Tahir Kamran’s book is reflective of concerns arising from the global history of Empire and the new urban history of South Asia. These are addressed thematically rather than through a conventional chronological narrative, as the book uncovers previously neglected areas of Lahore’s history, including the links between Lahore’s and Bombay’s early film industries and the impact on the ‘tourist gaze’ of the consumption of both text and visual representation of India in newsreels and photographs.

    Authors

    Ian Talbot is Professor of modern British history and formerly head of history at the University of Southampton. He has written numerous books on the Partition of India, and the modern history of Pakistan.

    Tahir Kamran teaches history at G. C. University, Lahore and was until recently Allama Iqbal Fellow at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Wolfson College. He has published widely on sectarian militancy and the politics of religious exclusion in Pakistan and is an editor of the Pakistan Journal of Historical Studies.

    Reviews

    ‘This is a must read book by two leading specialists on Punjab history, providing a wonderfully rich introduction into the character and cosmopolitanism of  Lahore under the raj. The volume is clearly written, well researched, and joy to read. It  should be of great interest to the specialist and generalist alike.’ — Gurharpal Singh, Professor in Inter-Religious Relations and Development, SOAS, University of London

    Colonial Lahore breathes new life into this city’s recent history, bringing the local into direct and often intimate conversation with the global, and vice versa.  It transforms our appreciation of Lahore’s unique past, in effect sealing the city’s credentials as one of South Asia’s most important, if often overlooked, zones of interaction in the era of imperial globalisation.’ — Sarah Ansari, Professor of History, Royal Holloway, University of London

    ‘A very rich account of colonial Lahore, essential for understanding the place of the city in South Asia’s past. It shows the great diversity and complexity of the city Lahore, and importantly, how it stood at the very heart of imperial connections and networks across the empire’. — Yasmin Khan, University Lecturer (Associate Professor) in British History, author of The Great Partition: the Making of India and Pakistan

    ‘Talbot and Kamran have made one of the first scholarly attempts to explore the social, cultural, and, to some extent, the economic, life of Lahore — one of the world’s great cities, known to some as the ‘Paris of the East’. Focussing on the colonial period, they make good use of evidence ranging from tourist guidebooks to newspaper advertisements. They also succeed in placing the city at the centre of a web of connections reaching out to the great cities of India – Calcutta, Delhi, Bombay and Karachi, but also to Afghanistan, Arabia, Europe and North America. The love which Talbot and Kamran have for Lahore is evident throughout.’ — Francis Robinson, Professor of the History of South Asia, Royal Holloway, University of London

    Hardback, February 2017 / 9781849046534 / 256pp

    25,00
  • Darfur and the British

    R. S. O’Fahey

    This volume presents annotated selections from the British records that were copied in situ by the author in al-Fashir and Kutum in 1970 and 1974 and of which the originals were subsequently destroyed by accident. The British were in Darfur for only forty years (1916–56) and, administratively, their impact was minimal. In retrospect, their most important role was in recording and codifying the customary law and administrative practice under the sultans. Their significance has become the greater recently following reports that the Sudan National Records Office is no long accessible to researchers. Darfur was unique in a Sudanese colonial context in that in 1916 the British conquered a functioning multi-ethnic African Muslim state. Their policy in the forty years of their rule was largely to maintain the system they had inherited from the sultans. Although they made some administrative modifications, it was only in the last few years before independence in 1956 that tentative steps were taken towards change, for example the introduction of local government in the towns. The material described here, a combination of administrative practice and ethnographic reporting, is far from simply academic in importance, but is invaluable on such issues as land tenure, agricultural practice, grazing rights and livestock migration routes, tribal administration and compensation for injury and death.

    Author

    R.S. O’Fahey is Professor of History at the Department of Middle Eastern and African History, University of Bergen, Norway.

    Reviews

    ‘Sean O’Fahey, the premier historian of Darfur, has produced an invaluable compendium of key documents from the brief but significant period of British administration in the province, with insightful commentary. It is a fascinating window into a world that has passed into history, but whose details are still highly relevant to administration and conflict resolution in Darfur today. It is also a record of how the British consolidated Darfur’s older sultanic system of governance, in a way that retains a powerful grip on Darfurians’ political imagination.’ — Alex de Waal, Research Professor and Executive Director of the World Peace Foundation, Tufts University

    ‘This magnificent and carefully evaluated collection of closely commented documents could easily be titled “Understanding Sudan’s Sahelian crisis”, so helpful is it in explaining why the Nilotic giant is choking on his undigested western colony.’ — Gerard Prunier, author of Darfur: The Ambiguous Genocide

    Hardback / January 2017 / 9781850659488 / 352pp

    65,00
  • De vergeten geschiedenis van mijn grootvader Sulayman Hadj Ali

    Meltem Halaceli

    Meltem Halaceli komt met de ontdekking van de verloren gewaande memoires van haar opa Sulayman Hadj Ali, een alawiet, op het spoor van een verborgen geschiedenis. Om te begrijpen wat haar grootvader als dienstplichtig soldaat in het Osmaanse leger in de Eerste Wereldoorlog heeft doorgemaakt, moet ze op reis naar zijn geboortestad Adana, in het zuiden van het huidige Turkije. En om te begrijpen wat oorlog is, gaat ze naar Beiroet.
    Terwijl ze het dagboek in het Nederlands vertaalt (en deels in dit boek publiceert) ontdekt ze verborgen kanten van haar afkomst. Hadj Ali’s geschiedenis heeft een enorme invloed gehad en bepaalt haar eigen identiteit. Door de recente ontwikkelingen in Syrië is die geschiedenis bovendien hoogst actueel. De periode waarin haar grootvader leefde was een scharnierpunt in de geschiedenis van het Midden-Oosten, en de invloed ervan is nog lang niet uitgewerkt…

    Author

    Meltem Halaceli

    Reviews

    248pp / 9789025306762 / paperback

    17,50
  • Inside the Islamic Republic

    Monshipouri, Mahmood

    The post-Khomeini era has profoundly changed the socio-political landscape of Iran. Since 1989, the internal dynamics of change in Iran, rooted in a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic, and behavioral factors, have led to a noticeable transition in both societal and governmental structures of power, as well as the way in which many Iranians have come to deal with the changing conditions of their society. This is all exacerbated by the global trend of communication and information expansion, as Iran has increasingly become the site of the burgeoning demands for women’s rights, individual freedoms, and festering tensions and conflicts over cultural politics. These realities, among other things, have rendered Iran a country of unprecedented—and at time paradoxical—changes. This book explains how and why.

    Author

    Mahmood Monshipouri is Professor of International Relations at San Francisco State University. He has published and edited a number of books, most recently Democratic Uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa: Youth, Technology, and Modernization.

    Reviews

    ‘As the Islamic Revolution of Iran approaches its fortieth anniversary, a popular conception of this country persists: that of a static society under the control of hardline anti-Western clerics. This volume provides an alternative reading of Iran by focusing on the dynamics of social change. Focusing on a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic and international factors, this group of distinguished Iranian studies scholars, demonstrate the evolution and transformation of changing identities, norms and values that often challenge the authoritarian model of Iran’s revolutionary founders. The future of Iran is very much connected to these developments making this volume essential reading for any serious student of this topic.’ — Nader Hashemi, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies, University of Denver

    ‘Hundreds of books and articles have been published about post-revolutionary Iran in the West, many of which offer only a crude caricature of the Islamic Republic. This erudite volume provides a important corrective to the superficial portrayal of Iran’s society, culture and politics. The contributors have deep knowledge and understanding of a huge breadth of issues concerning the country, informed by years of scholarly research. A must-read’. — Nader Entessar, co-author of Iran Nuclear Negotiations: Accord and Détente since the Geneva Agreement of 2013

    Inside the Islamic Republic is an excellent collection of articles about the profound changes that have taken place inside Iran during the past three decades. Written by some of the leading experts on modern Iran, the book addresses such important issues as the struggle for democracy, women’s rights, and the role cinema, music, and poetry plays in Iranian society. Anyone interested in understanding Iran as it is, and not as it is portrayed in the mass media, must read this seminal book.’ — Mohsen M. Milani, Executive Director, USF World Center for Strategic & Diplomatic Studies (CSDS), University of South Florida

    28,00
  • Syria

    Gertrude Bell

    You may rely upon one thing – I’ll never engage in creating kings again; it’s too great a strain.”Gertrude Bell – traveller, scholar, archaeologist, spy – was one of the most powerful figures in the Middle East in the 20th century. With T.E. Lawrence, she was a significant force behind the Arab Revolt and was responsible for creating the boundaries of the modern state of Iraq, as well as installing the Hashemite dynasty, with Faisal I as king, in Iraq and Transjordan. Her knowledge of the Arab world was forged through decades of travel and the relationships she built across Arabia with tribal leaders and kings, who referred to her as Umm al Mu’mineen, or Mother of the Faithful. In the winter of 1906, she undertook an often dangerous journey through Greater Syria – Damascus, Jerusalem, Beirut, Antioch and Alexandretta – and her portrait of the landscapes, people and customs of a part of the world that very few had explored at the time is now a classic of travel writing. Bell’s Syria illuminates a region that continues to preoccupy us today as well as portraying the unique life of a remarkable, still-controversial and ultimately tragic woman.

    16,00
  • The Circassian

    Fortna, Benjamin

    Eşref Kuşçubaşı remains controversial in Turkey over fifty years after his death. Elsewhere the man sometimes called the ‘Turkish Lawrence of Arabia’ is far less known but his life offers fascinating insights into the traumatic, increasingly violent struggles that ended the Ottoman Empire and ushered in the modern Middle East. Drawing on Eşref’s private papers for the first time, these pages tell the story of the making of a headstrong ‘self-sacrificing’ officer committed to defending the empire’s shrinking borders. Eşref took on a string of special assignments for Enver Pasha, the rapidly rising star of the Ottoman military, first in Libya against the Italians, then in the Balkan Wars and World War I, before being captured by the forces of the Arab Revolt and turned over to the British and imprisoned on Malta. Released in 1920, he joined the national resistance movement in Anatolia but fell out with Mustafa Kemal’s leadership and switched sides, earning him banishment from the Turkish Republic at its founding and exile until the 1950s. Never far from the action or controversy, Eşref’s dynamic story provides an important counterpoint to the standard narrative of the transition from empire to nation state.

    Author

    Benjamin C. Fortna is Professor and Director, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies at the University of Arizona. His research focus is the late Ottoman Empire and early Turkish Republic.

    Reviews

    ‘A highly original and important study. Fortna has found a treasure trove of original documents and handwritten memoirs of one of the leading militants of the Young Turk era. He has been able to combine this  archive with important primary sources from the Ottoman and Turkish military archives as well as from the National Archives in the UK. The result is a unique insider’s view of the traumatic and violent final decade of the Ottoman Empire.’ — Erik-Jan Zürcher, Professor of Turkish Studies, University of Leiden

    ‘Ben Fortna provides us with an honest history, of Eşref’s personal trajectory as much as his entanglements with the many world-historical events of his day. In doing so he helps pave the way toward a more nuanced understanding of the woefully understudied transition from the Ottoman Empire to the modern state of Turkey.’ — Christine Philliou, Associate Professor of History, University of California, Berkeley, and author of Biography of an Empire: Governing Ottomans in an Age of Revolution

    ‘Benjamin Fortna balances deftly the grand sweep of imperial collapse with the immediacy of biography. He explores the motivations and methods of Eşref, a “hard man” of the Young Turk era and notorious activist in the sensational events of the 1908-23 period, offering a rare alternative to the normal “clash-of-nations” depiction of the era. The result is a remarkably absorbing, insightful book.’ — Frederick Anscombe, Head of the Department of History, Birkbeck, University of London; author of State, Faith and Nation in Ottoman and Post-Ottoman Lands

    ‘Benjamin Fortna’s book is a major contribution to the history of the under-researched Special Organization (Teşkilât-ı Mahsusa). A biography of a leading CUP self-sacrificing volunteer, Eşref Kuşçubaşı, who occupied significant positions in the organization, The Circassian not only reproduces extremely important and hitherto unused documents and private papers but also draws a much larger picture of Ottoman intelligence and undercover operations during the final years of the empire.’ — M. Şükrü Hanioğlu, Garrett Professor in Foreign Affairs, Princeton University

    ‘Eşref Bey has become a legendary figure, blurring the boundaries between historical reality and popular imagination. It is partly because of this legend and partly because Eşref fought directly opposite another legendary figure that he has been referred to as the Turkish Lawrence of Arabia”. This tag is problematic — Eşref was an Ottoman of Circassian background and, somewhat ironically in the circumstances, he considered T. E. Lawrence as having developed into a legendary figure who far surpassed his historical role—but it is one that has stuck.’ — from Professor Fortna’s Introduction

     

    20,00
  • The Pakistan Paradox

    Jaffrelot, Christophe

    Pakistan was born as the creation of elite Urdu-speaking Muslims who sought to govern a state that would maintain their dominance. After rallying non-Urdu speaking leaders around him, Jinnah imposed a unitary definition of the new nation state that obliterated linguistic diversity. This centralisation — ‘justified’ by the Indian threat — fostered centrifugal forces that resulted in Bengali secessionism in 1971 and Baloch, as well as Mohajir, separatisms today.

    Concentration of power in the hands of the establishment remained the norm, and while authoritarianism peaked under military rule, democracy failed to usher in reform, and the rule of law remained fragile at best under Zulfikar Bhutto and later Nawaz Sharif. While Jinnah and Ayub Khan regarded religion as a cultural marker, since their time the Islamists have gradually prevailed. They benefited from the support of General Zia, while others, including sectarian groups, cashed in on their struggle against the establishment to woo the disenfranchised.

    Today, Pakistan faces existential challenges ranging from ethnic strife to Islamism, two sources of instability which hark back to elite domination. But the resilience of the country and its people, the resolve of the judiciary and hints of reform in the army may open a new and more stable chapter in its history.
    Pakistan was born as the creation of elite Urdu-speaking Muslims who sought to govern a state that would maintain their dominance. After rallying non-Urdu speaking leaders around him, Jinnah imposed a unitary definition of the new nation state that obliterated linguistic diversity. This centralisation — ‘justified’ by the Indian threat — fostered centrifugal forces that resulted in Bengali secessionism in 1971 and Baloch, as well as Mohajir, separatisms today.

    Concentration of power in the hands of the establishment remained the norm, and while authoritarianism peaked under military rule, democracy failed to usher in reform, and the rule of law remained fragile at best under Zulfikar Bhutto and later Nawaz Sharif. While Jinnah and Ayub Khan regarded religion as a cultural marker, since their time the Islamists have gradually prevailed. They benefited from the support of General Zia, while others, including sectarian groups, cashed in on their struggle against the establishment to woo the disenfranchised.

    Today, Pakistan faces existential challenges ranging from ethnic strife to Islamism, two sources of instability which hark back to elite domination. But the resilience of the country and its people, the resolve of the judiciary and hints of reform in the army may open a new and more stable chapter in its history.

    25,00
  • The Pearl of Khorasan

    Gammell, CPW

    The city of Herat in western Afghanistan long sat at the edge of empires and served as a hub for trade and a conduit for armies. Yet it has been much more than simply a staging post or play¬thing of political ambition. It has been an impe¬rial capital, a city of extraordinary wealth, and has played host to a cultural renaissance to rival that of Florence. The Pearl of Khorasan tells the his¬tory of this storied oasis city, from the invasions of Chingiz Khan in 1221 to the present day. An epilogue assesses the challenges Herat faces in the wake of Afghanistan’s recent turmoil.

    Throughout Herat’s cycles of conquest and habitation, several patterns emerge: the primacy of geography; the city’s strong identification with the fertility of the banks of the Hari River; and its reputation as a place of theological excel¬lence, tolerance and cultural refinement. From the luminescent genius of the Timurid century to the destruction and cultural vandalism associ¬ated with the Taliban’s rule of Afghanistan and the post-9/11 conflict, Herat has hosted empires and experienced the cupidity and lust for power of foreign agents. Using Persian, Pashto and Brit¬ish sources, the author paints a vivid picture of a city in which he has lived, presenting a personal vision of its tumultuous history.

    36,00
  • The Poisoned Well

    Hardy, Roger

    Rated 4.50 out of 5

    Almost fifty years after Britain and France left the Middle East, the toxic legacies of their rule continue to fester. To make sense of today’s conflicts and crises, we need to grasp how Western imperialism shaped the region and its destiny in the half-century between 1917 and 1967. Roger Hardy unearths an imperial history stretching from North Africa to southern Arabia that sowed the seeds of future conflict and poisoned relations between the Middle East and the West. Drawing on a rich cast of eye-witnesses — ranging from nationalists and colonial administrators to soldiers, spies, and courtesans — The Poisoned Well brings to life the making of the modern Middle East, highlighting the great dramas of decolonisation such as the end of the Palestine mandate, the Suez crisis, the Algerian war of independence, and the retreat from Aden.

    Concise and beautifully written, The Poisoned Well offers a thought-provoking and insightful story of the colonial legacy in the Middle East.

    Author

    Roger Hardy worked for more than twenty years as a Middle East analyst with the BBC World Service. He is the author of The Muslim Revolt: A Journey through Political Islam (2010) and is a Research Associate at the Centre for International Studies in Oxford.

    Reviews

    ‘[Hardy] navigates the rocks and eddies of the region’s history with a sure touch and brilliant eye for detail. In The Poisoned Well he provides a superb overview of events from the early 19th century … Hardy skilfully zooms in on individual narratives, showing how major events were witnessed and influenced by observers at the time. His book is peopled with a variety of characters, great and humble, deftly sketched and brought to life.’ — The Financial Times

    ‘Despite the familiarity of the subject matter, Mr Hardy provides us with a gripping and illuminating addition to this literature. He is even-handed throughout, passionate without being sentimental and has a great turn of phrase … He also has a particular talent … for simplifying complex situations on the ground for the benefit of his reader.’ — The Economist

    ‘[Hardy] provides a concise and lucid historical survey, enlivened by the first-hand accounts of participants.’ — The Tablet

    ‘Roger Hardy’s lively new account of British and French imperialism in the region is bursting with memorable anecdotes, intriguing detail and splashes of colour that illuminate a canvas of power, greed and double standards – and other legacies left standing amidst the wreckage of the Palestine Mandate or Algerie Française.’ — Ian Black, LSE Review of Books

    ‘Roger Hardy distils the imperial past of the Middle East down to its essentials. Through memorable vignettes and powerful insights, he has produced a sharply-focused and brilliant history of the modern Middle East.’ — Eugene Rogan, author of The Fall of the Ottomans: The Great War in the Middle East, 1914-1920

    ‘a vivid account of the half-century between 1917 and 1967 … The Poisoned Well is a lively and elegant book full of colorful details. Its 10 chapters knit together the many dramas of decolonization … [and] a rich cast of eye-witnesses … It is difficult to imagine the order that will eventually emerge from the current meltdown in the Middle East. But The Poisoned Well is a good place to understand many of the origins of today’s chaos.’ — Hurriyet Daily News

    ‘A short and popularly accessible history of the late colonial period in the Middle East, combining general comment and analysis with country by country studies. The author’s personal authority and sensibly quiet and judicious tone adds greatly to its general impression and effect.’ — Roger Owen, Emeritus Professor of Middle East History, Harvard University

    ‘Why is the Middle East plagued by perpetual conflict, violence, and misrule? The reasons are rooted in imperial history, and Roger Hardy unearths them skilfully in this concise, clearly-written, and accurate analysis. The Poisoned Well should be on every reading list for those who seek to understand today’s events in the region.’ — Thomas W. Lippman, Middle East Institute, Washington, DC; former Middle East bureau chief of the Washington Post, and author of Saudi Arabia on the Edge

    The Poisoned Well offers a thought-provoking and insightful study of the colonial legacy in the Middle East. Clear, concise and beautifully written, the book is a pleasure to read.’ — Nigel Ashton, Professor of International History, London School of Economics

    ‘Roger Hardy recounts the saga of Western imperialism and its far-reaching inheritance, elucidating the roles played by the French, the British, the Russians, and the Americans in the formation of the modern Middle East, and tracing the emergence of the post-colonial states. He argues that Western imperialism poisoned relations between Middle Eastern societies and the West. The Poisoned Well stands out from other works on the subject for its concision, its insightful detail, and its apposite use of biography to humanise the big-canvas story he is telling. Written in an appealing, yet erudite, style, this book should appeal to specialists on non-specialists alike.’ — John Calvert, Professor of History, Creighton University

    This historical drama is narrated through the memoirs of political leaders, diplomats and journalists who witnessed those times, making this book highly readable and rich in Governance, law and ethics. – International Affairs

    24,00
  • Salafism After the Arab Awakening

    Cavatorta, Francesco

    One of the most interesting consequences of the Arab awakening has been the central role of Salafists in a number of countries. In particular, there seems to have been a move away from traditional quietism towards an increasing degree of politicisation. The arrival on the political scene of Salafist parties in Egypt, Tunisia, and Yemen, as well as the seemingly growing desire of Salafists in other Arab countries to enter institutional politics through the creation of political parties, highlights quite clearly the debates around how to react to the awakening within Salafist circles.

    This book examines in detail how Salafism, both theologically and politically, is contending with the Arab uprisings across a number of countries. The focus is primarily on what kind of politicisation, if any, has taken place and what forms it has adopted. As some of the contributions make clear, politicisation does not necessarily diminish the role of jihad or the influence of quietism, revealing tensions and struggles within the complex world of Salafism.

    Authors

    Francesco Cavatorta is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, Université Laval in Quebec, Canada. His research focuses on processes of democratisation and authoritarian resilience in the Arab world.

    Fabio Merone is a research fellow in the School of Law and Government, Dublin City University, Ireland. He is currently working on his PhD at the University of Ghent with a project on Tunisian Salafism.

    Reviews

    ‘Edited volumes rarely become must-reads, but this is an exception. Packed with original research by top scholars in the field, it is essential reading for anyone interested in the future of political Islam after the 2011 revolutions.’ — Thomas Hegghammer, Director of terrorism research at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment in Oslo and author of Jihad in Saudi Arabia

    ‘This hugely important study of Salafism, which considers how the tradition has reacted and responded to the tumultuous events of recent years, could hardly be more timely. By surveying the different constructions of contemporary Salafism, readers are left with a rich overview of how this unique and opaque religious tradition continues to evolve. Cavatorta and Merone have also assembled a formidable stable of contributors, making this work an essential reference for anyone interested in modern Salafism.’ — Shiraz Maher, author of Salafi-Jihadism: The History of an Idea

    Salafism After the Arab Awakening fills a major gap by offering a comparison of Salafi politics after the Arab Spring and should certainly be read widely. Great, detailed articles from renowned scholars in the field.’ — Will McCants, director of the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World at the Brookings Institution and author of The ISIS Apocalypse: The History, Strategy, and Doomsday Vision of the Islamic State

    ‘This volume brings together the leading international scholars on Salafism and its intersection with Jihadi ideology and political movements. It will certainly be an indispensable reference for anyone interested in these issues, book-ending Roel Meijer’s pre-Arab Spring Global Salafism volume.’ — Jonathan AC Brown, Alwaleed bin Talal Chair of Islamic Civilization at Georgetown University and author of Misquoting Muhammad

     

    39,00
  • The Despot’s Accomplice

    Klaas, Brian

    ‘This is an important book for all who want to understand and do something about the crisis of democracy in our turbulent world. Klaas tells a disturbing story, but he offers hope — and a dose of humor — while showing how the West can turn the tide, if it acts wisely and quickly. Essential reading.’ –Walter Mondale, Former Vice President of the United States, Ambassador to Japan, and United States Senator

    ‘For the last few decades, liberal democracy was on the march. Today, however, the world is going through a democratic recession. In this thought-provoking book, Brian Klaas points the finger at a surprising villain: the West itself. He argues that Western governments have too often been accomplices to authoritarianism; through sins of commission and admission. An enjoyable and challenging addition to the literature on democracy promotion.’ -— Mark Leonard, founder and director of the European Council on Foreign Relations

    ‘This lucid, wide-ranging, up-to-date analysis of US democracy promotion offers penetrating critical insights as well as practical recommendations for doing better. Klaas is an engaging, lively guide through the complex thickets of democracy policy challenges and dilemmas.’ — Thomas Carothers, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    For the first time since the end of the Cold War, the world is steadily becoming less democratic. The true culprits are dictators and counterfeit democrats. But, argues Klaas, the West is also an accomplice, inadvertently assaulting pro-democracy forces abroad as governments in Washington, London and Brussels chase pyrrhic short-term economic and security victories. Friendly fire from Western democracies against democracy abroad is too high a price to pay for a myopic foreign policy that is ultimately making the world less prosperous, stable and democratic.

    The Despot’s Accomplice draws on years of extensive interviews on the frontlines of the global struggle for democracy, from a poetry-reading, politician-kidnapping general in Madagascar to Islamist torture victims in Tunisia, Belarusian opposition activists tailed by the KGB, West African rebels, and tea-sipping members of the Thai junta. Cumulatively, their stories weave together a tale of a broken system at the root of democracy’s global retreat.

    28,00
  • The Syrian Jihad

    Lister, Charles

    ‘Lister’s book will certainly become a classic of the literature on the Syrian civil war. This richly-documented study actually consists of two intertwined histories, as the account of the Jihadi insurgency, a tour de force in its own right, is complemented with in-depth analysis of the broader military developments.’ — Thomas Pierret, Lecturer in Contemporary Islam, University of Edinburgh and author of Religion and State in Syria: The Sunni Ulama from Coup to Revolution

    The eruption of the anti-Assad revolution in Syria has had many unintended consequences, among which is the opportunity it offered Sunni jihadists to establish a foothold in the heart of the Middle East. That Syria’s ongoing civil war is so brutal and protracted has only compounded the situation, as have developments in Iraq and Lebanon. Ranging across the battlefields and international borders have been dozens of jihadi Islamist fighting groups, of which some coalesced into significant factions such as Jabhat al Nusra and the Islamic State.

    This book assesses and explains the emergence since 2011 of Sunni jihadist organisations in Syria’s fledgling insurgency, charts their evolution and situates them within the global Islamist project. Unprecedented numbers of foreign fighters have joined such groups, who will almost certainly continue to host them. Thus, external factors in their emergence are scrutinised, including the strategic and tactical lessons learned from other jihadist conflict zones and the complex interplay between Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State and how it has influenced the jihadist sphere in Syria. Tensions between and conflict within such groups also feature in this indispensable volume.

    Lister’s knowledge of the various groups is impressive… The Syrian Jihad is an indispensable guide to the different jihadi factions.’ — New York Times 

    Author

    Charles R. Lister is Resident Fellow at the Middle East Institute in Washington DC. Previously, he was a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Doha Center, and head of the Middle East and North Africa section at IHS Jane’s Terrorism and Insurgency Centre.

    Reviews

    ‘Lister wants to tell the story of the emergence and evolution of the struggle of Sunni jihadists and their Syrian Salafist allies against President Assad, and he tells it with exceptional erudition and lucidity … His wide-ranging access gives the book a vitality that combines with the author’s comprehensive analysis of Syria, its political structures and its history to give the most detailed account yet written of how Sunni jihadists have come to dominate an (admittedly loose) anti-regime movement … required reading for both experts and the general reader alike.’ — Prospect 

    ‘Lister has done yeoman’s work in tracing how the peaceful uprising that began in 2011 was hijacked by an Islamist insurgency that now threatens global security. … as [he] persuasively argues, ISIS is itself a product of Mr. Assad’s evil regime.’ — Wall Street Journal

    ‘Lister’s magisterial work, one of the best I’ve read on the enduring conflict in Syria, is … not just granular in its level of detail but one that combines interviews with insurgents and a readable chronology events as well as a writing style that Tom Clancy would be proud of … Lister should be congratulated for putting together a must read account that unravels complexity, chronicles a detailed narrative and provides a serious contribution to the studies of Syria’s bloody war.’ — Huffington Post

    ‘There can be few people better qualified than Charles Lister to describe and explain the evolution of extremist groups in Syria and the complexities of the insurgency. He does so with great skill and authority in The Syrian Jihad, an invaluable aid to understanding what will surely be a defining conflict of our age.’ — Richard Barrett, former Director of Global Counter Terrorism Operations for the British Secret Intelligence Service, and coordinator of the United Nations Al-Qaeda–Taliban Monitoring Team

    ‘Charles Lister has written a deeply reported account of the jihad in Syria, bringing to bear his extensive knowledge of the conflict to offer a persuasive analysis of how it has become the terrible war that it is today.’ — Peter Bergen, author of Manhunt: From 9/11 to Abbottabad, the Ten Year Search for Bin Laden

    ‘Charles Lister offers compelling arguments woven together in a convincing and readable narrative. Drawing heavily on first-hand interviews, this ambitious and superbly organised account of the trajectories of Syria’s various jihadi groups ranks it among the best books on how ISIS and Al Qaeda metastasized in the brutal chaos of the Syrian war.’ — Andrew Tabler, Martin J. Gross Fellow in the Program on Arab Politics at The Washington Institute

    ‘Lister’s book will certainly become a classic of the literature on the Syrian civil war. This richly-documented study actually consists of two intertwined histories, as the account of the jihadi insurgency, a tour de force in its own right, is complemented with in-depth analysis of the broader military developments.’ — Thomas Pierret, University of Edinburgh, author of Religion and State in Syria

    The Syrian Jihad is detailed and easy to grasp, offering a comprehensive account of the Syrian civil war and the complexities involved. It proves itself as an indispensable guide to the different jihadist groups, their governance structures and modes of operations, and how these have mutated over time. It will be invaluable to students of terrorism studies who are interested in understanding the various levels and patterns of individual mobilisations and motivations; changing war tactics; how regime responses can tilt the balance; and the future of jihadist militancy which, despite its survival, is hanging in the balance.’ — LSE Review of Books

    18,00
  • Transitional Justice in the Middle East and North Africa

    Sriram, Chandra Lekha

    Following the ‘Arab Spring’ uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa, many had high hopes not only for democratisation but also for transitional justice to address the myriad abuses that had taken place in the region, both during the uprisings and for decades prior to them. Protesters had called not only for removal of corrupt and abusive leaders, but also for the protection of human rights more generally, including socio-economic rights as well as civil and political rights. Despite these hopes, most of the transitions in the region have stalled, along with the possibility of transitional justice.

    This volume is the first to look at this process and brings together leading experts in the fields of human rights and transitional justice, and in the history, politics and justice systems of countries such as Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Algeria, Bahrain and Morocco. While these countries have diverse histories, political institutions, and experiences with accountability, most have experienced non-transition, stalled transition, or political manipulation of transitional justice measures, highlighting the limits of such mechanisms. These studies should inform reflection not only on the role of transitional justice in the region, but also on challenges to its operation more generally.

    Author

    Chandra Lekha Sriram is Professor of International Law and International Relations, at the University of East London, where she is founder and Director of the Centre on Human Rights in Conflict. She is currently the chair of the International Studies Association Human Rights Section, and the co-chair of the London Transitional Justice Network.

    Reviews

    ‘This important new book brings together leading scholars on the Middle East and North Africa in the first volume to examine what transitional justice means following the Arab Spring. It offers a nuanced analysis of the ways in which pursuing accountability in the region is both similar to, and different from, previous experiences in other regions and will be of great interest to scholars of human rights and the region.’ — Ruti Teitel, Ernst C.Stiefel Professor of Comparative Law, New York Law School, author of Globalizing Transitional Justice

    ‘This important and innovative volume seeks to use experience from the Arab world to inform a route to transitional justice approaches relevant for the region despite its current turmoil, and that can aid a rethinking of assumptions about the role and scope of transitional justice globally.’ — Simon Robins, Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York

    Paperback January 2017 / 9781849046497 / 320pp

    27,00
  • Balochistan, the British and the Great Game

    Heathcote, T. A.

    The Great Game for Central Asia led to British involvement in Balochistan, a sparsely-populated area in Pakistan, mostly desert and mountain, and containing the Bolan Pass, the southern counterpart of the more famous Khyber. It occupies a position of great strategic importance between Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran and the Arabian Sea.

    Heathcote’s book is a history of the Khanate of Kalat and of British operations against the Baloch hill tribes who raided frontier settlements and the Bolan caravans. Its themes include rivalry between British officials in Sind and the Punjab, high profile disputes between British politicians over frontier policy and organisation, and the British occupation of Quetta, guardian city of the Bolan, in the run-up to the Second Afghan War. Among the many strong characters in this story is Sir Robert Sandeman, hitherto hailed as ‘the peaceful conqueror of Balochistan’, now revealed as a ruthless careerist, whose personal ambitions led to the fragmentation of the country under British domination. The closing chapter summarises subsequent events up to modern times, in which the Baloch have maintained a long-running struggle for greater autonomy within Pakistan.

    Author

    A. Heathcote studied history at SOAS, London, from where he joined the National Army Museum. He later transferred to the RMA Sandhurst, where he was for many years the Curator.

    Reviews

    ‘This book comprehensively details the greater Balochistan area, its place in the strategic Great Game, and the interesting role played by British officials there. It enhances our understanding of this still volatile and important region and is a “must read” for those wanting to know about Balochistan’s history in depth.’ — Christopher Snedden, Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, Honolulu, and author of Understanding Kashmir and Kashmiris

    ‘Tony Heathcote, the author of several distinguished works on the British military in India, brings a wealth of expertise to this study of the “Great Game”. He tells a fascinating story that needs to be read by anyone who seeks to understand an area that remains, to this day, strategically vital.’ — Gary Sheffield, Professor of War Studies, University of Wolverhampton

    ‘Heathcote’s impressive archival research and encyclopaedic understanding of this complex region yields a fascinating narrative from a long-ignored chapter of Britain’s colonial enterprise in South Asia. For scholars, students and general readers alike, the story of Balochistan’s role in the game of Empire and its colourful central characters proves engaging, enlightening and — above all — entertaining.’ — Willem Marx, journalist and author of Balochistan at a Crossroads

    30,00
  • Citizen Hariri

    Baumann, Hannes

    Rafiq Hariri was Lebanon’s Silvio Berlusconi: a ‘self-made’ billionaire who became prime minister and shaped postwar reconstruction. His assassination in February 2005 almost tipped the country into civil strife. Yet Hariri was neither a militia leader nor from a traditional political family. How did this outsider rise to wield such immense political and economic power?

    Citizen Hariri shows how the billionaire converted his wealth and close ties to the Saudi monarchy into political power. Hariri is used as a prism to examine how changes in global neoliberalism reshaped Lebanese politics. He initiated urban megaprojects and inflated the banking sector. And having grown rich as a contractor in the Gulf, he turned Lebanon into an outlet for Gulf capital. The concentration of wealth and the restructuring of the postwar Lebanese state were comparable to the effects of neoliberalism elsewhere. But at the same time, Hariri was a deeply Lebanese figure. He had to fend against militia leaders and a hostile Syrian regime. The billionaire outsider eventually came to behave like a traditional Lebanese political patron. Hannes Baumnann assesses not only the personal legacy of the man dubbed ‘Mr Lebanon’ but charts the wider social and economic transformations his rise represented.

    Author
    Hannes Baumann is a lecturer at the University of Liverpool. His current research looks at the politics of Gulf investment in non-oil Arab states. He previously taught or researched at King’s College London, Georgetown University, the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

    Reviews

    ‘Baumann provides a brilliant study of the neoliberal reconstruction in post-war Lebanon by an oligarchy of warlords, bankers and contractors, who subordinated the state to private interests and enriched themselves on rent extraction, increasing unemployment, poverty and social inequalities.’ — Fawwaz Traboulsi, author of A History of Modern Lebanon

    ‘A masterly account of the introduction of neoliberalism in Lebanon. Combining sociological and economic analysis, Citizen Hariri provides a fresh look at clientelism, governance, class formation, and the state in Lebanon. It will be a key work for years to come.’ — Sune Haugbølle, Associate Professor at Roskilde University, and author of War and Memory in Lebanon

    ‘This insightful and clever book justifiably puts political economy at the center of the analysis, but also exposes the ways in which Hariri’s engagement in politics fueled an increasingly “sectarian” emphasis as he sought power in Lebanon’s power-sharing system. The careful exposition of large-scale state interference with property rights and currency markets is an important contribution.’ — Melani Cammett, Professor of Government, Harvard University, and author of Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon

    Citizen Hariri not only provides us with a critical biography of one of the modern Middle East’s most fascinating political figures, it also throws new light on state–business relations and the politics of economic reforms in the wider region.’ — Steffen Hertog, Associate Professor, London School of Economics and Political Science, and co-editor of Business Politics in the Middle East

    ‘An insightful, sharp and timely analysis of Hariri. This is an invaluable contribution that sheds light on contemporary politics in Lebanon, and a must-read for all those interested in the post-civil war era.’ — Mayssoun Sukarieh, Lecturer in Middle Eastern Studies, King’s College London and co-author of Youth Rising? The Politics of Youth in the Global Economy

    ‘Citizen Hariri is the first head-on, comprehensive inquiry into Lebanon’s turn to “neoliberalism”; much rejected and despaired, but rarely analysed as powerfully as here. No other book so compellingly brings to life Mister Lebanon, the country’s turbulent politics, and the predicament of being ruled and governed by “real existing neoliberalism”.’ — Reinoud Leenders, King’s College London, author of Spoils of Truce – Corruption and State-Building in Postwar Lebanon

     

    40,00
  • From Independence to Revolution

    Gillian Kennedy

    From Independence to Revolution tells the story of the complicated relationship between the Egyptian population and the nation’s most prominent political opposition — the Islamist movement. Most commentators focus on the Muslim Brotherhood and radical jihadists constantly vying for power under successive authoritarian rulers, from Gamal Abdul Nasser to General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. Yet the relationship between the Islamists and Egyptian society has not remained fixed. Instead, groups like the Muslim Brotherhood, radical jihadists and progressive Islamists like Tayyar al Masri have varied in their responses to Egypt’s socio-political transformation over the last sixty years, thereby attracting different sections of the Egyptian electorate at different times.

    From bread riots in the 1970s to the 2011 Tahrir Square uprising and the subsequent election of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi in 2012, Egypt’s Islamists have been countering authoritarian elites since colonial independence. This book is based on the author’s fieldwork interviews in Egypt and builds on comparative political approaches to the topic. It offers an account of Egypt’s contesting actors, demonstrating how a consistently fragmented Islamist movement and an authoritarian state have cemented political instability and economic decline as a persistent trend.

    Author

    Gillian Kennedy has a PhD in Middle Eastern Politics from King’s College London. She works for Canadean as lead analyst for the MENA region and is a visiting research fellow at King’s College. Previously she has had articles published on Open Democracy and in the Montreal Review, as well as appearing as a regular commentator on Egyptian politics for BBC Newshour.

    Reviews

    ‘In this meticulously researched book, Kennedy examines the many faces of Islamism in Egypt and the dialectical relationship between the Muslim Brotherhood, the most powerful Islamist trend, and the authoritarian nationalist state. Conceptually rigorous and empirically rich, From Independence to Revolution highlights the multiple dualities in Egyptian politics and the fierce struggle for power which has led to an arrested social development. Kennedy’s book deserves wide readership.‘ — Fawaz Gerges, Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics, author of ISIS: A History

    ‘In this well-researched book, Kennedy tracks the testy relationship between the various strands of Egyptian Islamism and the bureaucratic-authoritarian orders of Nasser, Sadat, and Mubarak. In her focus on Islamism’s ideological and strategic shortcomings, Kennedy advances our understanding of Egypt’s religio-political landscape, including the contentious events that led to the downfall of the Muslim Brotherhood in 2013.’ — John Calvert, Professor of History, Creighton University, author of Sayyid Qutb and the Origins of Radical Islamism

    ‘Kennedy provides a theoretically informed and readable account of Egyptian Islamism. The book’s strength is to locate the evolution of distinct Islamist trends within Egypt’s shifting economic, political and social terrain. Kennedy develops a convincing argument to explain why Islamism was unable to capitalise on the opportunity presented by the fall of the Mubarak regime in 2011.’ — Ewan Stein, Senior Lecturer in International Relations, University of Edinburgh, and author of Intellectual Dynamics in the Middle East and North Africa

    From Independence to Revolution is a superb account of Egyptian Islamism and its interactions with the state. Kennedy adeptly deploys Gramscian concepts to provide the reader with a theoretically informed study of how to understand Islamism in Egypt. It is this novel theoretical approach that makes this such a significant contribution to the study of an important phenomenon.’ — Francesco Cavatorta, Associate Professor, Université Laval in Quebec, Canada, co-editor of Salafism After the Arab Awakening

    February 2017 – 9781849047050 –  264pp – Paperback

    26,00
  • Guardians of the Arab State

    Florence Gaub

    Guardians of the Arab State explains clearly and concisely how and why military organisations become involved in politics across the Middle East and North Africa, identifying four key factors: a high degree of organisational capacity, clear institutional interest, a forgiving population and weak civilian control.

    Looking at numerous case studies ranging from Mauritania to Iraq, the book finds that these factors are common to all Arab countries to have experienced coups in the last century. It also finds that the opposite is true in cases like Jordan, where strong civilian control and the absence of capacity, interest, or a positive public image made coup attempts futile. Gaub also convincingly argues that the reasons are structural rather than cultural, thereby proving a counter-narrative to conventional explanations which look at Arab coups along religious or historical lines. In essence, the questions addressed herein lead back to issues of weak statehood, legitimacy, and resource constraints — all problems the Arab world has struggled with since independence. Guardians of the Arab State picks up where previous literature on Middle Eastern military forces dropped the debate, and provides an updated and insightful analysis into the soul of Arab armies.

    Author

    Florence Gaub

    Florence Gaub is a senior analyst at the EU Institute for Security Studies; previously, she was employed at NATO Defence College. Her first book for Hurst, Guardians of the Arab State: When Militaries Intervene in Politics, from Iraq to Mauritania, was published by Hurst in March 2017. Florence Gaub works on the Arab world with a focus on conflict and security, with particular emphasis on Iraq, Lebanon and Libya. She also works on Arab military forces more generally, conflict structures and the geostrategic dimensions of the Arab region. Previously employed at NATO Defence College and the German parliament, she wrote her PhD on the Lebanese army at Humboldt University Berlin and holds degrees from Sciences Po Paris, Sorbonne and Munich universities.

    Reviews

    ‘A must-read book for all those seeking to understand the critical role of armies in the rise and fall of states in the Arab world and the critical role that they have played historically and since the uprisings of 2011, written by one of the leading experts on the subject.’ — Paul Salem, Vice President for Policy and Research, the Middle East Institute, Washington DC

    ‘Florence Gaub has produced a masterful analysis of the complex and critical relationship between Arab leaders and their militaries, a severely understudied topic. Her examination of these militaries’ political role should be read by anyone seeking to understand the Arab world— its history, the catalysts for the Arab uprisings, and its trajectory for the future.’ — Mara E. Karlin, PhD, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense

    ‘Florence Gaub has truly grasped the intricate military and political balance that continues to define the Arab World today. How can we find a middle ground between building strong armies capable of shielding a region marred by instability, while also embracing the necessary reforms to attain more inclusive and peaceful societies? This is but one of the many questions that she presses us to contemplate in this very well documented book.’ — General Tannous Mouawad, Lebanese Army (Ret’d)

    ‘The political trajectory of the Middle East and North Africa after World War II looks on the face of it to have been a series of military coups, revolutions, civil wars and failing states. Indeed, the Arab world seems particularly prone to military involvement in politics — Why is this? Where does it happen? And why does it sometimes not? Florence Gaub gives clear answers to these questions, analyses perfectly the role of the militaries, civilian governments and the people in almost each of the Arab countries, and draws convincing conclusions. An excellent book.’ — Wolf-Dieter Löser, former General, German Army and Commandant of the NATO Defense College

    ‘This book is a must-read for diplomatic and military planners across the globe who are concerned about stability in the Middle East, a region with no shortage of military coups, revolutions, civil wars and failing states.  Understanding the foundations of civil-military triad — regional civilian leaders’ legitimacy, Arab military capabilities, and citizen threat perception— is a critical requirement for the pursuit of regional stability. This book provides an historical portrait of why Arab armies get involved in the political space and provides policy recommendations for necessary reforms.’ — Paula Broadwell,  former Deputy Director of the Fletcher School Counter-terrorism Center

     

    9781849046480 – 224pp – Hardback – March 2017

    32,00
  • Inside the Islamic Republic

    Monshipouri, Mahmood

    The post-Khomeini era has profoundly changed the socio-political landscape of Iran. Since 1989, the internal dynamics of change in Iran, rooted in a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic, and behavioral factors, have led to a noticeable transition in both societal and governmental structures of power, as well as the way in which many Iranians have come to deal with the changing conditions of their society. This is all exacerbated by the global trend of communication and information expansion, as Iran has increasingly become the site of the burgeoning demands for women’s rights, individual freedoms, and festering tensions and conflicts over cultural politics. These realities, among other things, have rendered Iran a country of unprecedented—and at time paradoxical—changes. This book explains how and why.

    Author

    Mahmood Monshipouri is Professor of International Relations at San Francisco State University. He has published and edited a number of books, most recently Democratic Uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa: Youth, Technology, and Modernization.

    Reviews

    ‘As the Islamic Revolution of Iran approaches its fortieth anniversary, a popular conception of this country persists: that of a static society under the control of hardline anti-Western clerics. This volume provides an alternative reading of Iran by focusing on the dynamics of social change. Focusing on a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic and international factors, this group of distinguished Iranian studies scholars, demonstrate the evolution and transformation of changing identities, norms and values that often challenge the authoritarian model of Iran’s revolutionary founders. The future of Iran is very much connected to these developments making this volume essential reading for any serious student of this topic.’ — Nader Hashemi, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies, University of Denver

    ‘Hundreds of books and articles have been published about post-revolutionary Iran in the West, many of which offer only a crude caricature of the Islamic Republic. This erudite volume provides a important corrective to the superficial portrayal of Iran’s society, culture and politics. The contributors have deep knowledge and understanding of a huge breadth of issues concerning the country, informed by years of scholarly research. A must-read’. — Nader Entessar, co-author of Iran Nuclear Negotiations: Accord and Détente since the Geneva Agreement of 2013

    Inside the Islamic Republic is an excellent collection of articles about the profound changes that have taken place inside Iran during the past three decades. Written by some of the leading experts on modern Iran, the book addresses such important issues as the struggle for democracy, women’s rights, and the role cinema, music, and poetry plays in Iranian society. Anyone interested in understanding Iran as it is, and not as it is portrayed in the mass media, must read this seminal book.’ — Mohsen M. Milani, Executive Director, USF World Center for Strategic & Diplomatic Studies (CSDS), University of South Florida

    28,00
  • Islamist Terrorism in Europe

    Nesser, Petter

    The lethal attacks in Paris of January and November 2015 demonstrated the threat posed by militant Islamist extremism in Europe. While the death of Osama bin Laden and the advent of the ‘Arab Spring’ fed expectations that international jihadism was a spent force, Europe is still facing an increase in terrorist plotting. This has led to growing security concerns over the fallout of the Syrian conflict, and the sizeable contingents of battle-hardened European foreign fighters.

    This book provides a comprehensive account of the rise of jihadist militancy in Europe and offers a detailed background for understanding the current and future threat. Based on a wide range of new primary sources, it traces the phenomenon back to the late 1980s, and the formation of jihadist support networks in Europe in the early 1990s. Combining analytical rigour with empirical richness, the book offers a comprehensive account of patterns of terrorist cell formation and plots between 1995 and 2015. In contrast to existing research which has emphasized social explanations, failed immigration and homegrown radicalism, this book highlights the transnational aspects. It shows how jihadi terrorism in Europe is intrinsically linked to and reflects the ideological agendas of armed organizations in conflict zones, and how entrepreneurial jihad-veterans facilitate such transnationalization of militancy.

    Author

    Petter Nesser is a senior research fellow with the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI). Trained in Social Science, Middle Eastern Studies and Arabic, Nesser has conducted extensive research on jihadism in Europe for more than a decade, while focusing on motivational drivers, recruitment and radicalisation processes.

    22,00
  • Al-Shabaab in Somalia

    Hansen, Stig Jarle

    Since early 2007 a new breed of combatants has appeared on the streets of Mogadishu and other towns in Somalia: the ‘Shabaab’, or youth, the only self-proclaimed branch of al-Qaeda to have gained acceptance (and praise) from Ayman al-Zawahiri and ‘AQ centre’ in Afghanistan. Itself an offshoot of the Islamic Courts Union, which split in 2006, Al-Shabaab has imposed Sharia law and is also heavily influenced by local clan structures within Somalia itself. It remains an infamous and widely discussed, yet little-researched and understood, Islamist group. Hansen’s remarkable book attempts to go beyond the media headlines and simplistic analyses based on alarmist or localist narratives and, by employing intensive field research conducted within Somalia, as well as on the ground interviews with Al-Shabaab leaders themselves, explores the history of a remarkable organisation, one that has survived predictions of its collapse on several occasions. Hansen portrays Al-Shabaab as a hybrid Islamist organisation that combines a strong streak of Somali nationalism with the rhetorical obligations of international jihadism, thereby attracting a not insignificant number of foreign fighters to its ranks. Both these strands of Al-Shabaab have been inadvertently boosted by Ethiopian, American and African Union attempts to defeat it militarily, all of which have come to nought.

    Author

    Stig Jarle Hansen is an associate professor at the University of Life Sciences in Oslo where he teaches Norway’s only MA in International Relations. He speaks Somali, Swahili and Arabic and is the author of Al-Shabaab in Somalia (Hurst, 2013).

     

     

    “Essential reading … Hansen focuses on the complex ideological detours and military tactics of the Shabaab from its inception … a succinct and definitive history.’ — The Economist

    ‘If you want to understand the reality of the Al-Shabaab phenomenon in Somalia, its existence in the country and its grounding in that ravaged land, this short book, written by a researcher who actually engaged in person with his research topic, will provide you with more concrete nourishment than a whole raft of official reports.’ — Gérard Prunier, author of From Genocide to Continental War: The Congolese Conflict and the Crisis of Contemporary Africa

    Since early 2007, a new breed of combatants has appeared on the streets of Mogadishu and other towns in Somalia: the ‘Shabaab’, or youth, the only self-proclaimed branch of Al-Qaeda to have gained acceptance and praise from Ayman al-Zawahiri and the ‘AQ centre’ in Afghanistan. A 2006 offshoot of the Islamic Courts Union, the Shabaab have imposed Sharia law, while also being heavily influenced by local clan structures within Somalia.

    Hansen portrays this infamous and widely discussed, yet little-researched and understood group, as a hybrid Islamist organisation that combines a strong streak of Somali nationalism with the rhetorical obligations of international jihad, with the latter attracting a significant number of foreign fighters to its ranks.

    Hansen’s remarkable book goes beyond media headlines and simplistic analyses. By employing intensive field research conducted within Somalia, as well as on-the-ground interviews with Shabaab leaders themselves, he explores the history of an organisation that has survived predictions of its collapse on several occasions. Thus far, Ethiopian, American and African Union attempts to defeat it militarily have come to naught.

    17,00
  • Alle dagen Libanon

    Martijn van der Kooij

    Wie Libanon begrijpt, weet hoe het Midden-Oosten in elkaar zit. Alle belangrijke partijen die in de regio met elkaar in conflict zijn, wonen in dit kleine Mediterrane land. Een op de drie inwoners is vluchteling. Het land staat onder hoogspanning. In een serie meeslepende reportages schetst Martijn van der Kooij een modern, sensueel en vooral verwarrend land. Hij gaat op de thee bij Hezbollah, duikt in het nachtleven van mondain en gay Beiroet, beleeft een spannend avontuur in ‘tricky’ Tripoli en zoekt naar een verborgen synagoge.

    Alle Dagen Libanon is een onalledaags portret van een land dat cultureel en historisch nauw verbonden is met Europa met bijzondere verhalen over Libanon verteld vanuit de lokale bevolking. Het boek is gebaseerd op de vele bezoeken die van Van der Kooij sinds 2012 aan dit land aflegde. Hij geeft in het boek, dat ook foto’s bevat, ook reis- en bezoektips.

    Author

    Martijn van der Kooij (Fijnaart en Heijningen, 1974) is een Nederlandse journalist/schrijver. Sinds januari 2014 werkt hij voor het politieke radio-programma Kamerbreed van AVROTROS, dat elke zaterdag van 13:00 uur tot 14:00 uur wordt uitgezonden op NPO Radio 1. Bij BNR Nieuwsradio en WNL’s Avondspits was hij tot januari 2014 met grote regelmaat te gast als politiek analist. Van der Kooij schreef diverse boeken, waaronder een biografie van premier Mark Rutte en een verhalenbundel over Libanon.

    Reviews
    ‘De mozaïek van Libanon is in dit boek in al zijn kleurschakeringen treffend opgetekend.’ Sigrid Kaag, VN-gezant voor Libanon.

    ‘Prachtig sfeerbeeld van Libanon, dat voor de goed geïnformeerde toerist een topbestemming is.’ Hester Somsen, ambassadeur van Nederland in Libanon

    ‘Mooie verhalen, met onbevangen blik opgetekend, over een buitengewoon verrassend deel van de Arabische wereld.’ Hans Luiten, auteur van ‘Begrijp jij het Midden-Oosten nog?’

    9789491757341 / paperback / 136pp

    16,50
  • Citizen Hariri

    Baumann, Hannes

    Rafiq Hariri was Lebanon’s Silvio Berlusconi: a ‘self-made’ billionaire who became prime minister and shaped postwar reconstruction. His assassination in February 2005 almost tipped the country into civil strife. Yet Hariri was neither a militia leader nor from a traditional political family. How did this outsider rise to wield such immense political and economic power?

    Citizen Hariri shows how the billionaire converted his wealth and close ties to the Saudi monarchy into political power. Hariri is used as a prism to examine how changes in global neoliberalism reshaped Lebanese politics. He initiated urban megaprojects and inflated the banking sector. And having grown rich as a contractor in the Gulf, he turned Lebanon into an outlet for Gulf capital. The concentration of wealth and the restructuring of the postwar Lebanese state were comparable to the effects of neoliberalism elsewhere. But at the same time, Hariri was a deeply Lebanese figure. He had to fend against militia leaders and a hostile Syrian regime. The billionaire outsider eventually came to behave like a traditional Lebanese political patron. Hannes Baumnann assesses not only the personal legacy of the man dubbed ‘Mr Lebanon’ but charts the wider social and economic transformations his rise represented.

    Author
    Hannes Baumann is a lecturer at the University of Liverpool. His current research looks at the politics of Gulf investment in non-oil Arab states. He previously taught or researched at King’s College London, Georgetown University, the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

    Reviews

    ‘Baumann provides a brilliant study of the neoliberal reconstruction in post-war Lebanon by an oligarchy of warlords, bankers and contractors, who subordinated the state to private interests and enriched themselves on rent extraction, increasing unemployment, poverty and social inequalities.’ — Fawwaz Traboulsi, author of A History of Modern Lebanon

    ‘A masterly account of the introduction of neoliberalism in Lebanon. Combining sociological and economic analysis, Citizen Hariri provides a fresh look at clientelism, governance, class formation, and the state in Lebanon. It will be a key work for years to come.’ — Sune Haugbølle, Associate Professor at Roskilde University, and author of War and Memory in Lebanon

    ‘This insightful and clever book justifiably puts political economy at the center of the analysis, but also exposes the ways in which Hariri’s engagement in politics fueled an increasingly “sectarian” emphasis as he sought power in Lebanon’s power-sharing system. The careful exposition of large-scale state interference with property rights and currency markets is an important contribution.’ — Melani Cammett, Professor of Government, Harvard University, and author of Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon

    Citizen Hariri not only provides us with a critical biography of one of the modern Middle East’s most fascinating political figures, it also throws new light on state–business relations and the politics of economic reforms in the wider region.’ — Steffen Hertog, Associate Professor, London School of Economics and Political Science, and co-editor of Business Politics in the Middle East

    ‘An insightful, sharp and timely analysis of Hariri. This is an invaluable contribution that sheds light on contemporary politics in Lebanon, and a must-read for all those interested in the post-civil war era.’ — Mayssoun Sukarieh, Lecturer in Middle Eastern Studies, King’s College London and co-author of Youth Rising? The Politics of Youth in the Global Economy

    ‘Citizen Hariri is the first head-on, comprehensive inquiry into Lebanon’s turn to “neoliberalism”; much rejected and despaired, but rarely analysed as powerfully as here. No other book so compellingly brings to life Mister Lebanon, the country’s turbulent politics, and the predicament of being ruled and governed by “real existing neoliberalism”.’ — Reinoud Leenders, King’s College London, author of Spoils of Truce – Corruption and State-Building in Postwar Lebanon

     

    40,00
  • De vergeten geschiedenis van mijn grootvader Sulayman Hadj Ali

    Meltem Halaceli

    Meltem Halaceli komt met de ontdekking van de verloren gewaande memoires van haar opa Sulayman Hadj Ali, een alawiet, op het spoor van een verborgen geschiedenis. Om te begrijpen wat haar grootvader als dienstplichtig soldaat in het Osmaanse leger in de Eerste Wereldoorlog heeft doorgemaakt, moet ze op reis naar zijn geboortestad Adana, in het zuiden van het huidige Turkije. En om te begrijpen wat oorlog is, gaat ze naar Beiroet.
    Terwijl ze het dagboek in het Nederlands vertaalt (en deels in dit boek publiceert) ontdekt ze verborgen kanten van haar afkomst. Hadj Ali’s geschiedenis heeft een enorme invloed gehad en bepaalt haar eigen identiteit. Door de recente ontwikkelingen in Syrië is die geschiedenis bovendien hoogst actueel. De periode waarin haar grootvader leefde was een scharnierpunt in de geschiedenis van het Midden-Oosten, en de invloed ervan is nog lang niet uitgewerkt…

    Author

    Meltem Halaceli

    Reviews

    248pp / 9789025306762 / paperback

    17,50
  • From Deep State to Islamic State

    Filiu

    In his disturbing and timely book Jean-Pierre Filiu lays bare the strategies and tactics employed by the Middle Eastern autocracies, above all those of Syria, Egypt, Yemen and Algeria, that set out to crush the democratic uprisings of the ‘Arab Revolution’.

    In pursuit of these goals they turned to the intelligence agencies and internal security arms of the ‘deep state’, the armed forces and to street gangs such as the Shabiha to enforce their will. Alongside physical intimidation, imprisonment and murder, Arab counter-revolutionaries discredited and split their opponents by boosting Salafi–Jihadi groups such as Islamic State. They also released from prison hardline Islamists and secretly armed and funded them.

    The full potential of the Arab counter-revolution surprised most observers, who thought they had seen it all from the Arab despots: their perversity, their brutality, their voracity. But the wider world underestimated their ferocious readiness to literally burn down their countries in order to cling to absolute power. Bashar al-Assad clambered to the top of this murderous class of tyrants, driving nearly half of the Syrian population in to exile and executing tens of thousands of his opponents. He has set a grisly precedent, one that other Arab autocrats are sure to follow in their pursuit of absolute power.

    17,00
  • From Independence to Revolution

    Gillian Kennedy

    From Independence to Revolution tells the story of the complicated relationship between the Egyptian population and the nation’s most prominent political opposition — the Islamist movement. Most commentators focus on the Muslim Brotherhood and radical jihadists constantly vying for power under successive authoritarian rulers, from Gamal Abdul Nasser to General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. Yet the relationship between the Islamists and Egyptian society has not remained fixed. Instead, groups like the Muslim Brotherhood, radical jihadists and progressive Islamists like Tayyar al Masri have varied in their responses to Egypt’s socio-political transformation over the last sixty years, thereby attracting different sections of the Egyptian electorate at different times.

    From bread riots in the 1970s to the 2011 Tahrir Square uprising and the subsequent election of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi in 2012, Egypt’s Islamists have been countering authoritarian elites since colonial independence. This book is based on the author’s fieldwork interviews in Egypt and builds on comparative political approaches to the topic. It offers an account of Egypt’s contesting actors, demonstrating how a consistently fragmented Islamist movement and an authoritarian state have cemented political instability and economic decline as a persistent trend.

    Author

    Gillian Kennedy has a PhD in Middle Eastern Politics from King’s College London. She works for Canadean as lead analyst for the MENA region and is a visiting research fellow at King’s College. Previously she has had articles published on Open Democracy and in the Montreal Review, as well as appearing as a regular commentator on Egyptian politics for BBC Newshour.

    Reviews

    ‘In this meticulously researched book, Kennedy examines the many faces of Islamism in Egypt and the dialectical relationship between the Muslim Brotherhood, the most powerful Islamist trend, and the authoritarian nationalist state. Conceptually rigorous and empirically rich, From Independence to Revolution highlights the multiple dualities in Egyptian politics and the fierce struggle for power which has led to an arrested social development. Kennedy’s book deserves wide readership.‘ — Fawaz Gerges, Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics, author of ISIS: A History

    ‘In this well-researched book, Kennedy tracks the testy relationship between the various strands of Egyptian Islamism and the bureaucratic-authoritarian orders of Nasser, Sadat, and Mubarak. In her focus on Islamism’s ideological and strategic shortcomings, Kennedy advances our understanding of Egypt’s religio-political landscape, including the contentious events that led to the downfall of the Muslim Brotherhood in 2013.’ — John Calvert, Professor of History, Creighton University, author of Sayyid Qutb and the Origins of Radical Islamism

    ‘Kennedy provides a theoretically informed and readable account of Egyptian Islamism. The book’s strength is to locate the evolution of distinct Islamist trends within Egypt’s shifting economic, political and social terrain. Kennedy develops a convincing argument to explain why Islamism was unable to capitalise on the opportunity presented by the fall of the Mubarak regime in 2011.’ — Ewan Stein, Senior Lecturer in International Relations, University of Edinburgh, and author of Intellectual Dynamics in the Middle East and North Africa

    From Independence to Revolution is a superb account of Egyptian Islamism and its interactions with the state. Kennedy adeptly deploys Gramscian concepts to provide the reader with a theoretically informed study of how to understand Islamism in Egypt. It is this novel theoretical approach that makes this such a significant contribution to the study of an important phenomenon.’ — Francesco Cavatorta, Associate Professor, Université Laval in Quebec, Canada, co-editor of Salafism After the Arab Awakening

    February 2017 – 9781849047050 –  264pp – Paperback

    26,00