• Critical Muslim

    Sardar, Ziauddin

    Shanon Shah investigates the connections between geography and identity; Jasper M. Trautsch explains the invention of the West; Nazry Bahrawi asks if the collapse of Western civilisation is imminent; Gordon Blaine Steffey explores what a post- Western world might look like; Natasha Ezrow analyses US imperialism in Latin America; Elma Berisha compares Europe with Southeast Asia; Jalal Afhim explores the emergence of China; Shiv Visvanathan problematises the rise of India; Julia Sveshnikova critiques Russia’s supposed comeback; Michael Perez is proud to be American, Muslim, male and feminist; Sughra Ahmed argues that young British Muslims carve their identities out of Britain’s tradition of dissent; Amir Hussain suggests that Islam is a Western religion after all; Julian Bond and Fatimah Ashrif celebrate Christian–Muslim friendship; and Samia Rahman relates the remarkable story of an Uzbek pianist in London.

    About Critical Muslim: A quarterly publication of ideas and issues showcasing groundbreaking thinking on Islam and what it means to be a Muslim in a rapidly changing, interconnected world. Each edition centers on a discrete theme, and contributions include reportage, academic analysis, cultural commentary, photography, poetry, and book reviews.

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  • Critical Muslim

    Sardar, Ziauddin

    Samia Rahman is perplexed by our complex network of relationships, Aamer Hussein looks back on his affectionate bonds with the great Urdu writer Qurratulain Hyder (aka ‘Annie’), Syed Nomanul Haq follows classical scholars seeking royal patronage, Piro Rexhepi crosses borders in the Balkans, Annalisa Mormile traces the roots of disunity in the EU family, Benedikt Koehler highlights how the Italian scholar of Islam Leone Caetani saw East/West Relations, Julian Bond and Fatimah Ashrif engage in a (loving) interfaith dialogue, Mohammed Moussa explores family ties in Japanese politics, Elma Berisha is horrified by the spread of homogeneity, Michael Vicente Perez suggests that feminism is for everybody, Saulat Pervez sets out to cultivate reading habits, Ayisha Malik goes on a date in full hijab, and Ziauddin Sardar fails to cope with a troublesome Auntie.

    Also in this issue: a short story by Muddasir Ramzan, poetry by Mohja Kahf and Perzada Salman, Safeena Razzaq’s illustrated guide to the ‘Problems of a Brown Girl’, Nadiah Ghani on Muslim fashion, Aysha Garaeva on Soviet ‘death journeys’, Hassan Mahamdallie on the holy ignorance of Salafis and Islamists, Henry Brefo’s Last Word on African Chiefs and our List of the Top Ten relationship break-ups.

    Ziauddin Sardar

    Editor

    Ziauddin Sardar is an award-winning, internationally renowned writer, futurist and cultural critic. A former columnist on the New Statesman, he has also served as a Commissioner on the Equality and Human Rights Commission. He is the author of many books, including Desperately Seeking Paradise: Journeys of a Sceptical Muslim (Granta); Reading the Qur’an (Hurst); and Mecca: The Sacred City (Bloomsbury). Cultural critic Ziauddin Sardar is a bit of an ‘enfant terrible’ of the Muslim scholarship and one of Brittains most important public intellectuals. Currently, Ziauddin Sardar is Professor of Law and Society, Middlesex University. He’s the Chair of the Muslim Institute, a fellowship society that promotes knowledge and debate, which publishes the quarterly ‘Critical Muslim’.

     

    Paperback / January 2017 / 9781849048231 / 256pp

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