• Balochistan, the British and the Great Game

    Heathcote, T. A.

    The Great Game for Central Asia led to British involvement in Balochistan, a sparsely-populated area in Pakistan, mostly desert and mountain, and containing the Bolan Pass, the southern counterpart of the more famous Khyber. It occupies a position of great strategic importance between Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran and the Arabian Sea.

    Heathcote’s book is a history of the Khanate of Kalat and of British operations against the Baloch hill tribes who raided frontier settlements and the Bolan caravans. Its themes include rivalry between British officials in Sind and the Punjab, high profile disputes between British politicians over frontier policy and organisation, and the British occupation of Quetta, guardian city of the Bolan, in the run-up to the Second Afghan War. Among the many strong characters in this story is Sir Robert Sandeman, hitherto hailed as ‘the peaceful conqueror of Balochistan’, now revealed as a ruthless careerist, whose personal ambitions led to the fragmentation of the country under British domination. The closing chapter summarises subsequent events up to modern times, in which the Baloch have maintained a long-running struggle for greater autonomy within Pakistan.

    Author

    A. Heathcote studied history at SOAS, London, from where he joined the National Army Museum. He later transferred to the RMA Sandhurst, where he was for many years the Curator.

    Reviews

    ‘This book comprehensively details the greater Balochistan area, its place in the strategic Great Game, and the interesting role played by British officials there. It enhances our understanding of this still volatile and important region and is a “must read” for those wanting to know about Balochistan’s history in depth.’ — Christopher Snedden, Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, Honolulu, and author of Understanding Kashmir and Kashmiris

    ‘Tony Heathcote, the author of several distinguished works on the British military in India, brings a wealth of expertise to this study of the “Great Game”. He tells a fascinating story that needs to be read by anyone who seeks to understand an area that remains, to this day, strategically vital.’ — Gary Sheffield, Professor of War Studies, University of Wolverhampton

    ‘Heathcote’s impressive archival research and encyclopaedic understanding of this complex region yields a fascinating narrative from a long-ignored chapter of Britain’s colonial enterprise in South Asia. For scholars, students and general readers alike, the story of Balochistan’s role in the game of Empire and its colourful central characters proves engaging, enlightening and — above all — entertaining.’ — Willem Marx, journalist and author of Balochistan at a Crossroads

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  • Citizen Hariri

    Baumann, Hannes

    Rafiq Hariri was Lebanon’s Silvio Berlusconi: a ‘self-made’ billionaire who became prime minister and shaped postwar reconstruction. His assassination in February 2005 almost tipped the country into civil strife. Yet Hariri was neither a militia leader nor from a traditional political family. How did this outsider rise to wield such immense political and economic power?

    Citizen Hariri shows how the billionaire converted his wealth and close ties to the Saudi monarchy into political power. Hariri is used as a prism to examine how changes in global neoliberalism reshaped Lebanese politics. He initiated urban megaprojects and inflated the banking sector. And having grown rich as a contractor in the Gulf, he turned Lebanon into an outlet for Gulf capital. The concentration of wealth and the restructuring of the postwar Lebanese state were comparable to the effects of neoliberalism elsewhere. But at the same time, Hariri was a deeply Lebanese figure. He had to fend against militia leaders and a hostile Syrian regime. The billionaire outsider eventually came to behave like a traditional Lebanese political patron. Hannes Baumnann assesses not only the personal legacy of the man dubbed ‘Mr Lebanon’ but charts the wider social and economic transformations his rise represented.

    Author
    Hannes Baumann is a lecturer at the University of Liverpool. His current research looks at the politics of Gulf investment in non-oil Arab states. He previously taught or researched at King’s College London, Georgetown University, the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

    Reviews

    ‘Baumann provides a brilliant study of the neoliberal reconstruction in post-war Lebanon by an oligarchy of warlords, bankers and contractors, who subordinated the state to private interests and enriched themselves on rent extraction, increasing unemployment, poverty and social inequalities.’ — Fawwaz Traboulsi, author of A History of Modern Lebanon

    ‘A masterly account of the introduction of neoliberalism in Lebanon. Combining sociological and economic analysis, Citizen Hariri provides a fresh look at clientelism, governance, class formation, and the state in Lebanon. It will be a key work for years to come.’ — Sune Haugbølle, Associate Professor at Roskilde University, and author of War and Memory in Lebanon

    ‘This insightful and clever book justifiably puts political economy at the center of the analysis, but also exposes the ways in which Hariri’s engagement in politics fueled an increasingly “sectarian” emphasis as he sought power in Lebanon’s power-sharing system. The careful exposition of large-scale state interference with property rights and currency markets is an important contribution.’ — Melani Cammett, Professor of Government, Harvard University, and author of Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon

    Citizen Hariri not only provides us with a critical biography of one of the modern Middle East’s most fascinating political figures, it also throws new light on state–business relations and the politics of economic reforms in the wider region.’ — Steffen Hertog, Associate Professor, London School of Economics and Political Science, and co-editor of Business Politics in the Middle East

    ‘An insightful, sharp and timely analysis of Hariri. This is an invaluable contribution that sheds light on contemporary politics in Lebanon, and a must-read for all those interested in the post-civil war era.’ — Mayssoun Sukarieh, Lecturer in Middle Eastern Studies, King’s College London and co-author of Youth Rising? The Politics of Youth in the Global Economy

    ‘Citizen Hariri is the first head-on, comprehensive inquiry into Lebanon’s turn to “neoliberalism”; much rejected and despaired, but rarely analysed as powerfully as here. No other book so compellingly brings to life Mister Lebanon, the country’s turbulent politics, and the predicament of being ruled and governed by “real existing neoliberalism”.’ — Reinoud Leenders, King’s College London, author of Spoils of Truce – Corruption and State-Building in Postwar Lebanon

     

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  • Colonial Violence

    Dierk Walter

    Translated by Peter Lewis

    Western interventions today have much in common with the countless violent conflicts that have occurred on Europe’s periphery since the conquest of the Americas. Like their predecessors, modern imperial wars are shaped by geography and terrain and by pronounced asymmetries of military organisation, resources, modes of warfare and cultures of violence. Today’s imperial wars are essentially civil wars, in which Western powers are only one player among many. As ever, the Western military machine is incapable of resolving political strife through force, or of engaging opponents with no reason to offer conventional combat, who instead rely on guerrilla warfare and terrorism. And, as they always have, local populations pay the price for these shortcomings.

    Colonial Violence offers, for the first time, a coherent explanation of the logic of violent hostilities within the context of European expansion. Walter’s analysis reveals parallels between different empires and continuities spanning historical epochs. He concludes that recent Western military interventions, from Afghanistan to Mali, are not new wars, but stand in the 500-year-old tradition of transcultural violent conflict.

    Author

    Dierk Walter is a lecturer in Modern History at the Universities of Bern and Hamburg. His research focuses on the history of European expansion and Western military history since the eighteenth century. He has previously published a study on nineteenth-century Prussian military reform, and co-edited a number of volumes on military history and the Cold War.

    **(The translation of this work was funded by Geisteswissenschaften International — Translation Funding for Work in the Humanities and Social Sciences from Germany, a joint initiative of the Fitz Thyssen Foundation, the German Federal Foreign Office, the collecting society VG WORT and the Börsenverein des Deutschen Buchhandels (German Publishers & Booksellers Association)).

    Reviews

    It is excellent that Dierk Walter’s survey of colonial conflict has been translated into English. This is military history as it should be written: conceptually broad, chronologically ambitious.

    ‘An important book that offers a clear point of view on the violence inherent to imperialism, whether Western or not. Worth considering alongside high rates of violence in recent and current non-Western warfare.’ — Jeremy Black, Professor of History, University of Exeter

    ‘It is excellent that Dierk Walter’s survey of colonial conflict has been translated into English. This is military history as it should be written: conceptually broad, chronologically ambitious, and — above all — transnational. His case for continuity — bridging colonial conquest, decolonisation, and recent interventions — will provoke, as it should, but that is the hallmark of an important book.’ — Sir Hew Strachan, Chichele Professor of the History of War, Oxford University

    ‘Broad canvas syntheses that put violence at the heart of the West’s engagement with the wider world have been rare — understanding and acceptance of the significance and consequences of its violence rarer still. Walter brings enormous comparative and summary power to its study, resulting in a highly readable and necessary work. Colonial Violence should stand as an elegant corrective, particularly in its emphasis on the continuity of violence through to the present day.’ — Ashley Jackson, Professor of Imperial and Military History, King’s College London; author of The British Empire: A Very Short Introduction

    Colonial Violence offers a comprehensive, scholarly interpretation and synthesis of the pattern of military violence associated with imperialism since around 1600. Based on a wide and deep familiarity with imperial military campaigns and asymmetric conflict, its conclusions regarding the weakness of the imperial powers relative to their indigenous foes, the continuities in imperial campaigns over time and place, and the root cause of excessive violence in the imperial situation rather than in ideology, will surprise and challenge many readers. Well written and clearly organized, this study will doubtless become a standard account of imperial military violence.’ — Isabel Virginia Hull, John Stambaugh Professor of History, Cornell University

    ‘Walter, with forensic skill, comprehensively analyses the causes, courses, and consequences of colonial wars and violence. This startlingly good study should be read and thought over by all with an interest in Europe’s global imperial military reach over the past five hundred years.’ — David Killingray, Emeritus Professor, Goldsmiths London

    Hardback
    November 2017 / 9781849048071 / 352pp

     

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  • From Independence to Revolution

    Gillian Kennedy

    From Independence to Revolution tells the story of the complicated relationship between the Egyptian population and the nation’s most prominent political opposition — the Islamist movement. Most commentators focus on the Muslim Brotherhood and radical jihadists constantly vying for power under successive authoritarian rulers, from Gamal Abdul Nasser to General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. Yet the relationship between the Islamists and Egyptian society has not remained fixed. Instead, groups like the Muslim Brotherhood, radical jihadists and progressive Islamists like Tayyar al Masri have varied in their responses to Egypt’s socio-political transformation over the last sixty years, thereby attracting different sections of the Egyptian electorate at different times.

    From bread riots in the 1970s to the 2011 Tahrir Square uprising and the subsequent election of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi in 2012, Egypt’s Islamists have been countering authoritarian elites since colonial independence. This book is based on the author’s fieldwork interviews in Egypt and builds on comparative political approaches to the topic. It offers an account of Egypt’s contesting actors, demonstrating how a consistently fragmented Islamist movement and an authoritarian state have cemented political instability and economic decline as a persistent trend.

    Author

    Gillian Kennedy has a PhD in Middle Eastern Politics from King’s College London. She works for Canadean as lead analyst for the MENA region and is a visiting research fellow at King’s College. Previously she has had articles published on Open Democracy and in the Montreal Review, as well as appearing as a regular commentator on Egyptian politics for BBC Newshour.

    Reviews

    ‘In this meticulously researched book, Kennedy examines the many faces of Islamism in Egypt and the dialectical relationship between the Muslim Brotherhood, the most powerful Islamist trend, and the authoritarian nationalist state. Conceptually rigorous and empirically rich, From Independence to Revolution highlights the multiple dualities in Egyptian politics and the fierce struggle for power which has led to an arrested social development. Kennedy’s book deserves wide readership.‘ — Fawaz Gerges, Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics, author of ISIS: A History

    ‘In this well-researched book, Kennedy tracks the testy relationship between the various strands of Egyptian Islamism and the bureaucratic-authoritarian orders of Nasser, Sadat, and Mubarak. In her focus on Islamism’s ideological and strategic shortcomings, Kennedy advances our understanding of Egypt’s religio-political landscape, including the contentious events that led to the downfall of the Muslim Brotherhood in 2013.’ — John Calvert, Professor of History, Creighton University, author of Sayyid Qutb and the Origins of Radical Islamism

    ‘Kennedy provides a theoretically informed and readable account of Egyptian Islamism. The book’s strength is to locate the evolution of distinct Islamist trends within Egypt’s shifting economic, political and social terrain. Kennedy develops a convincing argument to explain why Islamism was unable to capitalise on the opportunity presented by the fall of the Mubarak regime in 2011.’ — Ewan Stein, Senior Lecturer in International Relations, University of Edinburgh, and author of Intellectual Dynamics in the Middle East and North Africa

    From Independence to Revolution is a superb account of Egyptian Islamism and its interactions with the state. Kennedy adeptly deploys Gramscian concepts to provide the reader with a theoretically informed study of how to understand Islamism in Egypt. It is this novel theoretical approach that makes this such a significant contribution to the study of an important phenomenon.’ — Francesco Cavatorta, Associate Professor, Université Laval in Quebec, Canada, co-editor of Salafism After the Arab Awakening

    February 2017 – 9781849047050 –  264pp – Paperback

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  • Gaza Under Hamas

    Bjorn Brenner

     

    Hamas is designated a terrorist organization by Israel, the EU, the USA and the UN. It has made itself notorious for its violent radicalism and uncompromising rejection of the Jewish state. So after its victory in the 2006 elections the world was watching. How would Hamas govern? Could an Islamist group without any experience of power – and with an unwavering ideology – manage to deal with day-to-day realities on the ground? Bjorn Brenner investigates what happened after the elections and puts the spotlight on the people over whom Hamas rules, rather than on its ideas. Lodging with Palestinian families and experiencing their daily encounters with Hamas, he offers an intimate perspective of the group as seen through local eyes. The book is based on hard-to-secure interviews with a wide range of key political and security figures in the Hamas administration, as well as with military commanders and members of the feared Qassam Brigades. Brenner has also sought out those that Hamas identifies as local trouble makers: the extreme Salafi-Jihadis and members of the now more quiescent mainstream Fatah party led by Mahmoud Abbas.

    The book provides a new interpretation of one of the most powerful forces in the Israel-Palestine arena, arguing that the Gazan Islamists carry a potential to be much more flexible and pragmatic than anticipated – if they would think they stand to gain from it. Gaza under Hamas investigates the key challenges to Hamas’s authority and reveals why and in what ways ideology comes second to power consolidation.

    Author

    Bjorn Brenner is Lecturer at the Swedish Defence University in Stockholm and

    Björn Brenner
    Foto : Rickard Kilström
    2012-11-23

    Research Fellow at Institut francais du Proche-Orient in Amman, Jordan. He holds a doctorate in Peace and Development Studies from the University of Gothenburg and an MA in Political Science from Uppsala University. He is the author of numerous articles on Palestinian and Israeli politics and is a frequently appearing commentator in the media on Middle Eastern affairs.

    Reviews

    “In Gaza under Hamas, Björn Brenner provides an inside view of Hamas in power, based on extensive fieldwork alongside trenchant insights and incisive analysis. His book is an important contribution to the literature by greatly enhancing our understanding of the evolution of terrorist organizations from grassroots violence to formal governance.” – Bruce Hoffman, Georgetown University. 

    “This is one of the rare books about Hamas that manages to be both balanced and insightful. Based on a broad range of primary sources, this in-depth study of Gaza under Hamas rule provides as full and comprehensive a picture as possible. A must-read for scholars, students, and diplomats alike!” – Peter Neumann, King’s College London

    “For academic researchers, policy makers, NGOs and broader civil society members interested in Islamist experiences and practices of governance this is a must read. The book not only helps address many misconceived notions about the challenges which Hamas has faced since it was elected in 2006 but it also assists readers in nuancing the particular context in which such a case of Islamist governance actually operates.” – Michelle Pace, Roskilde University

    “Gaza under Hamas is a fascinating, original, and uniquely well-researched analysis of how Hamas governs. Drawing on four years of ethnographic research, the author combines empirical granularity and analytical clarity to provide a wealth of new insights on the domestic politics of the Gaza Strip. The book will become the standard work on the Hamas administration and a must-read for anyone interested in rebel governance, political Islam, Middle East politics, Islamic Law, or Palestinian history.” – Thomas Hegghammer, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment

    “Brenner provides a well-researched, timely and extensive account of Hamas’s complex approach to governance, also offering a very interesting portrait of life in the Gaza Strip.” – Benedetta Berti, Institute for National Security Studies

    “What makes Brenner’s account especially valuable is its focus on how Hamas has managed to create a functioning government in Gaza – a subject that is little known This access to Hamas leaders and operatives will not be found in other studies.” – Perspectives on Terrorism, reviewed by Joshua Sinai

    “Brenner’s conclusion is a far cry from the clichéd statements about Hamas … Apart from establishing the centrality of Hamas rule to a political solution for Palestine, the book also expounds upon the spectrum of misconceptions, strengths and flaws associated with the movement. This approach provides a detailed assessment of Hamas in relation to Gaza and its unique circumstances, while dispelling mainstream manipulation, to which, as Brenner points out, academia has also contributed.” – Middle East Monitor, reviewed by Ramona Wadi

    “Brenner’s book constitutes an important contribution to our understanding of Hamas and how Islamist ideas are translated into political practices. Rarely do we have the opportunity to take stock of empirical research of a such a timely case. This book also provides a great opportunity for researchers to learn from Brenner’s best practices in how to conduct field research in conflict zones.” – Swedish Journal of Political Science, reviewed by Anders Malm

    Publisher: I.B.Tauris & Co Ltd.
    Series: Library of Modern Middle East Studies

    Hardback / ISBN: 9781784537777
    Publication Date: 18 Dec 2016
    Number of Pages: 256

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  • Go back to where you came from

    Sasha Polakow-Suransky

    What if the new far right poses a graver threat to liberal democracy than jihadists or mass migration?

    From Europe to the United States and beyond, opportunistic politicians have exploited economic crisis, terrorist attacks and an influx of refugees to bring hateful and reactionary views from the margins of political discourse into the corridors of power. This climate has already helped propel Donald Trump to the White House, pushed Britain out of the European Union, and put Marine Le Pen within striking distance of the French presidency.

    Sasha Polakow-Suransky’s on-the-ground reportage and interviews with the rising stars of the new right tell the story of how we got here, tracing the global rise of anti-immigration politics and the ruthlessly effective rebranding of Europe’s new far right as defenders of Western liberal values.

    Go Back to Where You Came From is an indispensable account of why xenophobia went mainstream in countries known historically as defenders of human rights and models of tolerance.

    Author

    Sasha Polakow-Suransky

    Sasha Polakow-Suransky is an Open Society Foundations fellow. He was an op-ed editor at the New York Times and a senior editor at Foreign Affairs and holds a doctorate in modern history from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. His writing has appeared in the GuardianForeign PolicyNewsweek, the New Republic and the​ Boston Globe.

    Reviews

    ‘Polakow-Suransky … has reported from across the globe for this book, providing dispatches from refu­gee camps and interviewing politicians, activists and immigrants on all sides of this debate. He captures social and political transformations in simple, memorable lines.’ — Washington Post

    ‘[Polakow-Suransky] has covered a good amount of territory, interviewed some of the continent’s characters, and given a fairish tour of recent events.’ Evening Standard

    Go Back to Where you Came From analyses the problem well … Sasha Polakow-Suransky … has painstakingly documented this phenomenon.’ — The Irish Times

    ‘Polakow-Suransky … has produced something badly needed in the English language: a comprehensive and impartial explanatory survey of the people and ideas behind the rise of the politics of intolerance, not just in Europe but across much of the Western world … this book’s strength is its window into Europe’s voices, past and present, and the links the author finds between them.’ — The Globe and Mail

    ‘Aided by conflict and a deflationary crisis not seen since the 1930s, the West has been taken over by a moral panic over immigrants that threatens to found a new fascism. Sasha Polakow-Suransky’s new book is a fine antidote to this motivated menace.’ — Yanis Varoufakis, author of And The Weak Suffer What They Must? Europe, Austerity and the Threat to Global Stability

    ‘An important, deeply reported investigation into the rise of the extreme right around the globe and a warning of the implications for western democracies. A must read for all concerned citizens.’ — Paul Mason, author of PostCapitalism

    ‘The populist rebellion sweeping the West is driven by a toxic combination of immigration, inequality, and identity. Sasha Polakow-Suransky’s superb new book unpacks the story, taking readers through a changing Europe bursting with promise yet racked by conflict. With its deep reportage, gripping prose, and powerful message, it is a must read for anyone trying to understand global politics today — and tomorrow.’ — Gideon Rose, Editor of Foreign Affairs

    ‘Sasha Polakow-Suransky confronts deep tensions between race, class, and borders that so many liberals would prefer to ignore, with detailed examples from Europe, the United States, and South Africa. For those of us deeply worried about the future of liberal democracy, Go Back to Where You Came From is an important and enlightening book.’ — Anne-Marie Slaughter, President and CEO of New America

    ‘A well-researched and authoritatively written analysis that resists easy answers and generalizations regarding the complex problems of immigration. … Polakow-Suransky plainly views the collapse of liberal democracy with alarm. Refreshingly, however, he generally steers clear of polemics and demonization, giving those on what he terms the “new far right” their voice and showing how widespread resistance to immigration in general, and Muslim immigration in particular, has moved from the fringes to the mainstream. …He shows how working-class liberalism has suffered a split between ideologues more concerned with identity politics and social issues and voters who pine for the way things used to be and feel like their parties have abandoned their interests in favor of minority rights and religious tolerance. … Not an apologia for resistance to immigration but rather a nuanced, important analysis of an issue fraught with complications.’ — Kirkus, starred review

    Hardback / October 2017 / 9781849049092 / 376pp

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  • Guardians of the Arab State

    Florence Gaub

    Guardians of the Arab State explains clearly and concisely how and why military organisations become involved in politics across the Middle East and North Africa, identifying four key factors: a high degree of organisational capacity, clear institutional interest, a forgiving population and weak civilian control.

    Looking at numerous case studies ranging from Mauritania to Iraq, the book finds that these factors are common to all Arab countries to have experienced coups in the last century. It also finds that the opposite is true in cases like Jordan, where strong civilian control and the absence of capacity, interest, or a positive public image made coup attempts futile. Gaub also convincingly argues that the reasons are structural rather than cultural, thereby proving a counter-narrative to conventional explanations which look at Arab coups along religious or historical lines. In essence, the questions addressed herein lead back to issues of weak statehood, legitimacy, and resource constraints — all problems the Arab world has struggled with since independence. Guardians of the Arab State picks up where previous literature on Middle Eastern military forces dropped the debate, and provides an updated and insightful analysis into the soul of Arab armies.

    Author

    Florence Gaub

    Florence Gaub is a senior analyst at the EU Institute for Security Studies; previously, she was employed at NATO Defence College. Her first book for Hurst, Guardians of the Arab State: When Militaries Intervene in Politics, from Iraq to Mauritania, was published by Hurst in March 2017. Florence Gaub works on the Arab world with a focus on conflict and security, with particular emphasis on Iraq, Lebanon and Libya. She also works on Arab military forces more generally, conflict structures and the geostrategic dimensions of the Arab region. Previously employed at NATO Defence College and the German parliament, she wrote her PhD on the Lebanese army at Humboldt University Berlin and holds degrees from Sciences Po Paris, Sorbonne and Munich universities.

    Reviews

    ‘A must-read book for all those seeking to understand the critical role of armies in the rise and fall of states in the Arab world and the critical role that they have played historically and since the uprisings of 2011, written by one of the leading experts on the subject.’ — Paul Salem, Vice President for Policy and Research, the Middle East Institute, Washington DC

    ‘Florence Gaub has produced a masterful analysis of the complex and critical relationship between Arab leaders and their militaries, a severely understudied topic. Her examination of these militaries’ political role should be read by anyone seeking to understand the Arab world— its history, the catalysts for the Arab uprisings, and its trajectory for the future.’ — Mara E. Karlin, PhD, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense

    ‘Florence Gaub has truly grasped the intricate military and political balance that continues to define the Arab World today. How can we find a middle ground between building strong armies capable of shielding a region marred by instability, while also embracing the necessary reforms to attain more inclusive and peaceful societies? This is but one of the many questions that she presses us to contemplate in this very well documented book.’ — General Tannous Mouawad, Lebanese Army (Ret’d)

    ‘The political trajectory of the Middle East and North Africa after World War II looks on the face of it to have been a series of military coups, revolutions, civil wars and failing states. Indeed, the Arab world seems particularly prone to military involvement in politics — Why is this? Where does it happen? And why does it sometimes not? Florence Gaub gives clear answers to these questions, analyses perfectly the role of the militaries, civilian governments and the people in almost each of the Arab countries, and draws convincing conclusions. An excellent book.’ — Wolf-Dieter Löser, former General, German Army and Commandant of the NATO Defense College

    ‘This book is a must-read for diplomatic and military planners across the globe who are concerned about stability in the Middle East, a region with no shortage of military coups, revolutions, civil wars and failing states.  Understanding the foundations of civil-military triad — regional civilian leaders’ legitimacy, Arab military capabilities, and citizen threat perception— is a critical requirement for the pursuit of regional stability. This book provides an historical portrait of why Arab armies get involved in the political space and provides policy recommendations for necessary reforms.’ — Paula Broadwell,  former Deputy Director of the Fletcher School Counter-terrorism Center

     

    9781849046480 – 224pp – Hardback – March 2017

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  • Inside the Islamic Republic

    Monshipouri, Mahmood

    The post-Khomeini era has profoundly changed the socio-political landscape of Iran. Since 1989, the internal dynamics of change in Iran, rooted in a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic, and behavioral factors, have led to a noticeable transition in both societal and governmental structures of power, as well as the way in which many Iranians have come to deal with the changing conditions of their society. This is all exacerbated by the global trend of communication and information expansion, as Iran has increasingly become the site of the burgeoning demands for women’s rights, individual freedoms, and festering tensions and conflicts over cultural politics. These realities, among other things, have rendered Iran a country of unprecedented—and at time paradoxical—changes. This book explains how and why.

    Author

    Mahmood Monshipouri is Professor of International Relations at San Francisco State University. He has published and edited a number of books, most recently Democratic Uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa: Youth, Technology, and Modernization.

    Reviews

    ‘As the Islamic Revolution of Iran approaches its fortieth anniversary, a popular conception of this country persists: that of a static society under the control of hardline anti-Western clerics. This volume provides an alternative reading of Iran by focusing on the dynamics of social change. Focusing on a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic and international factors, this group of distinguished Iranian studies scholars, demonstrate the evolution and transformation of changing identities, norms and values that often challenge the authoritarian model of Iran’s revolutionary founders. The future of Iran is very much connected to these developments making this volume essential reading for any serious student of this topic.’ — Nader Hashemi, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies, University of Denver

    ‘Hundreds of books and articles have been published about post-revolutionary Iran in the West, many of which offer only a crude caricature of the Islamic Republic. This erudite volume provides a important corrective to the superficial portrayal of Iran’s society, culture and politics. The contributors have deep knowledge and understanding of a huge breadth of issues concerning the country, informed by years of scholarly research. A must-read’. — Nader Entessar, co-author of Iran Nuclear Negotiations: Accord and Détente since the Geneva Agreement of 2013

    Inside the Islamic Republic is an excellent collection of articles about the profound changes that have taken place inside Iran during the past three decades. Written by some of the leading experts on modern Iran, the book addresses such important issues as the struggle for democracy, women’s rights, and the role cinema, music, and poetry plays in Iranian society. Anyone interested in understanding Iran as it is, and not as it is portrayed in the mass media, must read this seminal book.’ — Mohsen M. Milani, Executive Director, USF World Center for Strategic & Diplomatic Studies (CSDS), University of South Florida

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  • Islam After Liberalism

    Faisal Devji and Zaheer Kazmi

    Forged in the age of empire, the relationship between Islam and liberalism has taken on a sense of urgency today, when global conflicts are pitting one against the other. More than describing a civilizational fault-line between the Muslim world and the West, however, this relationship also offers the potential for consensus and the possibility of moral and political engagement or compatibility. The existence or extent of this correspondence is a defining characteristic of writing on the subject.

    This volume looks however to the way in which Muslim politics and society are defined beyond and indeed after it. Reappraising the ‘first wave’ of Islamic liberalism during the nineteenth century, the book describes the long and intertwined histories of these categories across a large geographical expanse. By drawing upon the contributions of scholars from a variety of disciplines — including philosophy, theology, sociology, politics and history — it explores how liberalism has been criticised and refashioned by Muslim thinkers and movements, to assume a reality beyond the abstractions that define its compatibility with Islam.

    Editors

    Faisal Devji is Reader in Modern South Asian History and Fellow of St. Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. He is the author of, inter alia, Muslim Zion: Pakistan as a Political Idea and The Impossible Indian: Gandhi and the Temptations of Violence.

    Zaheer Kazmi is a Senior Research Fellow at the Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice, Queen’s University Belfast. He has held research and visiting positions at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge and is the author of Polite Anarchy in International Relations Theory and co-editor of Contextualising Jihadi Thought.

    Reviews

    Liberalism is a Western ideology often linked to Africa and Asia in the shadow of Euro-American colonialism.

    ‘An enlightened exploration of the categories “Islam” and “liberalism” that deserves serious attention from both academics and non-academics alike.’ — Ziauddin Sardar, editor of Critical Muslim and author of Reading the Qu’ran

    ‘This highly original and timely collection of essays probes the relationship between liberalism and Islam in novel and often provocative ways. The book makes profound contributions to debates about Islam and liberalism, and offers innovative ways to rethink questions crucial to global politics.’ — Robert Crews, Associate Professor of History, Stanford University

    ‘This invigorating volume reassesses a debate pitting “liberal” Islam against an “illiberal” Islam, and enlists the former in the contemporary project of counter-extremism. The contributors skilfully illuminate the parameters and ambiguities of an intellectual genealogy and, in the process, highlight how this supposed paradigm is both emulated and contested.’ — James Piscatori, Professor at the Centre for the History of Political Thought, Durham University, and author of Muslim Politics

    ‘Liberalism is a Western ideology often linked to Africa and Asia in the shadow of Euro-American colonialism. This volume disrupts and complicates efforts to elide or contrast it with Islam. Its authors, diverse in discipline yet coherent in argument, provide unique insight into the ongoing engagements – political, cultural and academic – between Islamic narratives and liberal projects.’ — Bruce Bennett Lawrence, Nancy and Jeffrey Marcus Humanities Professor Emeritus of Religion, Duke University

    PaperbackOctober 2017  / 9781849047012 /  288pp

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  • Islamist Terrorism in Europe

    Nesser, Petter

    The lethal attacks in Paris of January and November 2015 demonstrated the threat posed by militant Islamist extremism in Europe. While the death of Osama bin Laden and the advent of the ‘Arab Spring’ fed expectations that international jihadism was a spent force, Europe is still facing an increase in terrorist plotting. This has led to growing security concerns over the fallout of the Syrian conflict, and the sizeable contingents of battle-hardened European foreign fighters.

    This book provides a comprehensive account of the rise of jihadist militancy in Europe and offers a detailed background for understanding the current and future threat. Based on a wide range of new primary sources, it traces the phenomenon back to the late 1980s, and the formation of jihadist support networks in Europe in the early 1990s. Combining analytical rigour with empirical richness, the book offers a comprehensive account of patterns of terrorist cell formation and plots between 1995 and 2015. In contrast to existing research which has emphasized social explanations, failed immigration and homegrown radicalism, this book highlights the transnational aspects. It shows how jihadi terrorism in Europe is intrinsically linked to and reflects the ideological agendas of armed organizations in conflict zones, and how entrepreneurial jihad-veterans facilitate such transnationalization of militancy.

    Author

    Petter Nesser is a senior research fellow with the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI). Trained in Social Science, Middle Eastern Studies and Arabic, Nesser has conducted extensive research on jihadism in Europe for more than a decade, while focusing on motivational drivers, recruitment and radicalisation processes.

    22,00
  • Jihad and Death

    Olivier Roy

    How has ISIS been able to muster support far beyond its initial constituency in the Arab world and attract tens of thousands of foreign volunteers, including converts to Islam, and seemingly countless supporters online? In this compelling intervention into the debate about ISIS’ origins and future prospects, the renowned French sociologist, Olivier Roy, argues that while terrorism and jihadism are familiar phenomena, the deliberate pursuit of death has produced a new kind of radical violence. In other words, we’re facing not a radicalization of Islam, but the Islamization of radicalism.

    Jihad and Death is a concise dissection of the highly sophisticated narrative mobilised by ISIS: the myth of the Caliphate recast into a modern story of heroism and nihilism. According to Roy, this very contemporary aesthetic of violence is less rooted in the history of Islamic thought than it is entrenched in a youth culture that has turned global and violent.

    Author

    Olivier Roy is one of the most distinguished analysts of and commentators on political Islam in the Middle East and Central Asia. The author of several highly acclaimed books, four of which are published by Hurst, he is Professor at the European University Institute in Florence.

    Olivier Roy’s work has always been both provocative and informative. This book is no exception; Roy provides readers with new scholarly insights into violence, its modern jihadi aesthetic, and “radicalisation” and its relationship to Islam. Whatever your opinion, this book will make you think, and think again. Without question, an essential contribution. — Tariq Ramadan

    ‘Roy’s brisk work is full of imaginative leaps, and that is what gives it value. There has been too much circular writing about the “mind of the terrorist”, too many assumptions about their supposed brainwashing. By examining the significance of death for these jihadists, he can dismantle their manifold confusions.’ — The Times

    ‘Olivier Roy is one of the most interestingly provocative thinkers on modern jihadism. In this excellent short book, the French academic reiterates his argument that we are seeing not “the radicalisation of Islam but the Islamisation of radicalism.”’ — Prospect

    ‘For three decades, Oliver Roy has pioneered innovative and insightful research on religion and politics in Islam and beyond. Equipped with analytical depth, historical sensitivity and a comparative lens, this book brings the analysis of jihad and death in the current radicalism to a new level. This is a must read for anyone who wants to understand the Islamization of radicalism.’ — Asef Bayat, Catherine and Bruce Bastian Professor of Global and Transnational Studies and Professor of Sociology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    ‘This is another extraordinary work from a master scholar of Muslim politics. Taking conventional wisdom head-on, Olivier Roy clinically unpacks the supposed relationship between religion and radicalisation. He tellingly warns us that all the attention on the caliphal pretensions of ISIS obscures the core challenges of nihilism, generational revolt, and a radical repudiation of social norms.’ — James Piscatori, Professor at the Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies, Australian National University, and co-author of Muslim Politics

    ‘Olivier Roy is widely respected for his decades-long research into radical Islam. More interested in actual processes than in opportunistic concepts, he describes in Jihad and Death how the self-proclaimed Islamic State plays more on its enemies’ fears than on its own strength. A very welcome and eye-opening intervention.’ — Jean-Pierre Filiu, Professor at the Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) and author of From Deep State to Islamic State

    ‘With Jihad and Death, Olivier Roy offers his contribution to the ongoing debate on jihadism and its causes, and advocates for a comparative sociological approach focused on the motivations of individual actors rather than grand theological debates. The result is deeply insightful, thought-provoking and deserves to be widely read.’ — Stéphane Lacroix, Associate Professor of Political Science, Sciences-Po, and author of Awakening Islam

    Hardback
    April 2017 • 9781849046985 • 136pp

    19,95
  • Landscapes of the Jihad

    Faisal Devji

     

     

    The militant Islam represented by Al-Qaeda is often described as a global movement. Apart from the geographical range of its operations and support, little else is held to define it as ‘global’.

    Landscapes of the Jihad explores the features that Al-Qaeda and other strands of militant Islam share in common with global movements. These include a decentralised organisation and an emphasis on ethical rather than properly political action. Devji brings these and other characteristics of Al-Qaeda together in an analysis of the jihad that locates it squarely within the transformation of political thought after the Cold War. The jihad emerges from the breakdown of traditional as well as modern forms of authority in the Muslim world. It is neither dogmatic in an old-fashioned way nor ideological in the modern sense, and concerned neither with correct doctrinal practice in the present nor with some revolutionary utopia of the future. Instead it is fragmented, dispersed and highly individualistic.

    Author

    Faisal Devji is Reader in Modern South Asian History and Fellow of St. Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. He is the author of, inter alia, Muslim Zion: Pakistan as a Political Idea and The Impossible Indian: Gandhi and the Temptations of Violence.

    Reviews

    ‘No political theorist, anthropologist or student of Islam will fail to be provoked and inspired by this brilliant analysis of jihadi discourse. […] Devji moves effortlessly between theology, history and cultural studies to give us the first major English-language interpretation of the moral world of contemporary jihad.’ — Professor Arjun Appadurai, New School University

    ‘Devji’s very original book analyses Al Qaeda and jihad in metaphysical terms, discarding geo-strategic and cultural factors, [hence] the West is also presented as a metaphysical entity. Globalization is thus not linked to strategy, territory or culture. The concept of landscape summarises his approach: action creates its own landscape and is not the expression of an pre-existing cultural, territorial or strategic divide. Hence there emerge different ‘landscapes’: of jihad, of mysticism, of media and of film, all of which combine with each other. […] Devji’s original analysis of the writings of Osama bin Laden and Ayman Al-Zawahiri is very illuminating and substantiates his iconoclastic approach.’ —Professor Olivier Roy, author, Globalised Islam: The Search for a New Ummah

    ‘One of the most intelligent analyses of the world-view of the militant Islamist.’ — The New Statesman

    ‘A brilliant long essay on the ethical underpinnings of modern jihad … Martyrdom, observes Devji rightly, “only achieves meaning by being witnessed by the media.” It is, short, a horrendous form of advertising.’ — New York Review of Books

    ‘Devji’s Landscapes of the Jihad examines the vitality of militant movements, arguing that in a global society, organizations like al-Qaeda have gathered meaning and strength in an “institutional vacuum” … Devji rejects the traditional scholarship that roots it in regional issues like the Palestinian cause and poverty and oppression. Most controversially, he equates militant Islam with “the plethora of non-governmental agencies dedicated to humanitarian work”. He also concludes, more conventionally, that the U.S. response to militant Islam — the “global war on terror” — has transformed war “into a species of policing”.’ — Publishers Weekly 

    The Terrorist in Search of Humanity is in many ways a sequel to Devji’s equally provocative 2005 book, Landscapes of the Jihad. Al Qaeda’s importance in the long run, Devji writes, lies not in its pioneering a new form of networked militancy … but instead in its fragmentation of traditional structures of Muslim authority within new global landscapes … it is a measure of Devji’s seriousness, and his unfailingly original turn of mind, that one waits impatiently for his next provocation.’ — The National

    ‘I enjoyed Landscapes Of The Jihad, in which Devji points out just how deeply unorthodox a Muslim Bin Laden is — not just in his espousal of indiscriminate violence but also his cult of martyrs and frequent talk of dream and visions, all of which derive from popular, mystical and Shia Islamic traditions, against which the orthodox has long struggled.’ — William Dalrymple, Sunday Herald

    Landscapes of the Jihad is very short, closely and narrowly focused, thought-provoking, and elegantly written … One refreshing aspect of Devji’s book is that it leans heavily on evidence from an area often neglected by scholars writing about Islam — the Indian subcontinent and Afghanistan.’ — Carole Hillenbrand, Times Literary Supplement

    ‘Do not approach this challenging essay … expecting a familiar narrative of al-Qaeda and its founder, or of the eponymous “war on terror”. Devji dispenses with conventional analysis and with much that is regarded as received wisdom … Devji describes how jihad has subordinated the local to the global. He plays down its Middle Eastern origins and he stresses its diverse sources (Shia and Sufi as well as Sunni) as well as its heterodox innovations. Bin Laden’s transformation of jihad, for example, from a collective to an individual duty, is a radical departure from the classical Islamic tradition. But how else could a global movement operate in a post-modern world where Muslims are moved to applause or to action by some spectacular act of violence, which they see on a television or computer screen? Conventional forms of top-down recruitment and mobilisation are, it seems, as passé as conventional politics … Landscapes of the Jihad is, in its unconventional thinking, an oasis in the wearisome desert of al-Qaeda studies. It is, in the best possible sense, subversive.’ — The Economist

    Paperback
    April 2017 • 9781849047203 • 200pp

    16,00
  • Lebanon

    Are Knudsen and Michael Kerr

    Lebanon is the prisoner of its geography and its history, a prize for invaders since ancient times, a small multi-denominational state still recovering from a bloody civil war in its search for political autonomy and stability. This book examines the country’s recent past since 2005, when a mass movement agitated against Syrian dominance in the wake of the assassination of former prime minister Rafik Hariri. Also detailed are the role of Hezbollah and other political groups. The authors examine the changes that these events brought to Lebanon, be they lasting or ephemeral, and the challenges they represent for a state which, despite the resilience of its power-sharing system of government, remains hotly contested and unconsolidated.

    Sectarian tensions have escalated, predominantly between the Sunni and Shia communities, causing outbursts of street-based violence and paralysis in government. This two-bloc system has left Lebanon ungovernable, not simply due to deep-seated political differences, but because of the external linkages which ties the two blocs to their foreign patrons, namely the USA and Iran. As the Arab Spring develops, it also increases Hezbollah’s significance to Iran as the embattled Assad regime struggles to quash the Syrian insurgency.

    Authors

    Are Knudsen is a Senior Researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI), Bergen, Norway.

    Michael Kerr is Professor of Conflict Studies and Director of the Institute for Middle Eastern Studies, King’s College London.

    Reviews

    ‘An outstanding contribution by young scholars to the understanding of modern Lebanon. In the wake of the Arab Spring, and especially the Syrian revolt, thoroughly recommended.’ — Lord Williams of Baglan, former UN Under Secretary General in the Middle East

    ‘Clear-eyed and often shrewd analysis of the huge political and social changes in Lebanon wrought by the Hariri assassination in 2005. Indispensable even for those who think they know the country well.’ — Roger Owen, A. J. Meyer Professor of Middle East History, Harvard University

    ‘They say that if you think you understand Lebanon you haven’t been studying it long enough. This book provides a shortcut. It is a must-read if you wish to understand today’s reality in this complex, fascinating and ever-attractive country.  From community power-sharing to corporate consociationalism, from the state of the army to the image-making around the late Rafiq Hariri, a wide range of topics are covered in great depth.’ — Frances Guy, British Ambassador to Beirut,  2006 – 2011

    ‘The book begins with a concise and informative summary by the co-editor Michael Kerr …overall there is a deft balance between scholarly discourse and the personal observation of an insider.’ – Times Literary Supplement

    ‘Compiled and edited with care, this timely volume is essential for anyone wishing to understand the complex eddies of contemporary Lebanon, showcasing true regional expertise without ever abandoning objectivity or critical independence.  As a work that explains the intricacies of Lebanese politics post-Hariri with clarity and precision, this cannot be surpassed.’ — Clive Jones, Chair of Middle East Studies and International Politics, University of Leeds

    ‘The expert contributions to this sophisticated volume address the tumultuous politics of post-2005 Lebanon. This is a valiant effort to throw light on the complexity of the country’s conflicts, its diverse internal identities and commonalities, its power-sharing arrangements and their intricate connections to regional and international actors and processes. The authors carefully trace the continuities from and ruptures with the country’s previous history. This is academia at its best, balancing empirical detail with conceptual sophistication and bringing together various disciplinary perspectives.’ — Katerina Dalacoura, Senior Lecturer in International Relations, London School of Economics

    ‘This book presents astute critical readings of post-“Cedar Revolution” Lebanon. Its interdisciplinary analysis of contemporary Lebanese history and politics offers an excellent overview of the on-going struggle over powersharing, state security, economic revitalisation and the post-war recovery.’ –– Craig Larkin, University of Exeter

    ‘Lebanon After the Cedar Revolution is indispensable reading not only for those seeking to understand how seemingly ungovernable fractious identities can be governed, and indeed can thrive. This is an exhaustive, sophisticated, and unique reference book on Lebanon as a window to the Levant, and to the feuding identities of the Middle East at large. It is a lucid, illuminating compilation that offers much needed catharsis and relief from a body of traditional analyses and interpretations of the region that often fall short, and mislead more than illuminate.’ — The Levantine Review

    ‘In eleven excellent and richly sourced essays, the authors of this volume dissect how and why [sectarian conflict] has been the dismal outcome of what was supposed to be a ‘revolution’. Although their work does not make for comfortable reading, they present what is probably the best-informed and documented analysis of this hapless country’s politics for over a decade.’ — International Affairs

    Table of Contents

    Note on transliteration

    Acknowledgements — Are Knudsen and Michael Kerr

    Author Biographies

    Foreword — Augustus R. Norton

    PART I: FOREIGN INTERVENTION, HEGEMONY AND CONSOCIATIONALISM

    1. Introduction: The Cedar Revolution And Beyond — Are Knudsen and Michael Kerr
    2. Before the Revolution — Michael Kerr
    3. The Limits Of Corporate Consociation: Taif and the Crisis of Power-Sharing in Lebanon Since 2005 — Amal Hamdan

    PART II: SOVEREIGNTY, SECURITY AND VIOLENCE

    1. Foreign Interventions, Power Sharing and the Dynamics of Conflict and Coexistence in Lebanon — Marie-Joelle Zahar
    2. Lebanon in Search of Sovereignty: Post-2005 Security Dilemmas — Elizabeth Picard
    3. Enclaves and Fortressed Archipelago: Violence and Governance in Lebanon’s Palestinian Refugee Camps — Sari Hanafi

    PART III: ENTREPRENEURS, STATESMEN AND MARTYRS

    1. The ‘New Contractor Bourgeoisie’ in Lebanese Politics: Hariri, Mikati and Fares — Hannes Baumann
    2. The Reconstruction of Lebanon or the Racketeering Rule — Fabrice Balanche
    3. The Making of a Martyr: Forging Rafik Hariri’s Symbolic Legacy — Ward Vloeberghs

    PART IV: TRUTH, COEXISTENCE AND JUSTICE

    1. ‘History’ and ‘Memory’ in Lebanon Since 2005: Blind Spots, Emotional Archives and Historiographic Challenges — Sune Haugbolle
    2. Sects and the City: Socio-Spatial Perceptions and Practices of Youth in Beirut — Nasser Yassin
    3. Special Tribunal for Lebanon: Homage to Hariri? — Are Knudsen

    Notes

    Bibliography

    Index

    Paperback
    October 2012 / 9781849042499 / 256pp

    20,00
  • Lebanon – After the Cedar Revolution

    Are Knudsen and Michael Kerr

    ‘An outstanding contribution by young scholars to the understanding of modern Lebanon … thoroughly recommended.’ — Lord Williams of Baglan, former UN Under Secretary General in the Middle East

    Lebanon is the prisoner of its geography and its history, a prize for invaders since ancient times, a small multi-denominational state still recovering from a bloody civil war in its search for political autonomy and stability. This book examines the country’s recent past since 2005, when a mass movement agitated against Syrian dominance in the wake of the assassination of former prime minister Rafik Hariri. Also detailed are the role of Hezbollah and other political groups.

    The authors examine the changes that these events brought to Lebanon, be they lasting or ephemeral, and the challenges they represent for a state which, despite the resilience of its power-sharing system of government, remains hotly contested and unconsolidated.

    Sectarian tensions have escalated, predominantly between the Sunni and Shia communities, causing outbursts of street-based violence and paralysis in government. This two-bloc system has left Lebanon ungovernable, not simply due to deep-seated political differences, but because of the external linkages which ties the two blocs to their foreign patrons, namely the USA and Iran. As the Arab Spring develops, it also increases Hezbollah’s significance to Iran as the embattled Assad regime struggles to quash the Syrian insurgency.

    Author

    Are Knudsen is a Senior Researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI), Bergen, Norway. Michael Kerr is Professor of Conflict Studies and Director of the Institute for Middle Eastern Studies, King’s College London.

    Table of Contents

    Note on transliteration

    Acknowledgements — Are Knudsen and Michael Kerr

    Author Biographies

    Foreword — Augustus R. Norton

    PART I: FOREIGN INTERVENTION, HEGEMONY AND CONSOCIATIONALISM

    1. Introduction: The Cedar Revolution And Beyond — Are Knudsen and Michael Kerr
    2. Before the Revolution — Michael Kerr
    3. The Limits of Corporate Consociation: Taif and the Crisis of Power-Sharing in Lebanon Since 2005 — Amal Hamda

    PART II: SOVEREIGNTY, SECURITY AND VIOLENCE

    1. Foreign Interventions, Power Sharing and the Dynamics of Conflict and Coexistence in Lebanon — Marie-Joelle Zahar
    2. Lebanon in Search of Sovereignty: Post-2005 Security Dilemmas — Elizabeth Picard
    3. Enclaves and Fortressed Archipelago: Violence and Governance in Lebanon’s Palestinian Refugee Camps — Sari Hanafi

    PART III: ENTREPRENEURS, STATESMEN AND MARTYRS

    1. The ‘New Contractor Bourgeoisie’ in Lebanese Politics: Hariri, Mikati and Fares — Hannes Baumann
    2. The Reconstruction of Lebanon or the Racketeering Rule — Fabrice Balanche
    3. The Making of a Martyr: Forging Rafik Hariri’s Symbolic Legacy — Ward Vloeberghs

    PART IV: TRUTH, COEXISTENCE AND JUSTICE

    1. ‘History’ and ‘Memory’ in Lebanon Since 2005: Blind Spots, Emotional Archives and Historiographic Challenges — Sune Haugbolle
    2. Sects and the City: Socio-Spatial Perceptions and Practices of Youth in Beirut — Nasser Yassin
    3. Special Tribunal for Lebanon: Homage to Hariri? — Are Knudsen

    Notes

    Bibliography

    Index

    Reviews

    ‘An outstanding contribution by young scholars to the understanding of modern Lebanon. In the wake of the Arab Spring, and especially the Syrian revolt, thoroughly recommended.’ — Lord Williams of Baglan, former UN Under Secretary General in the Middle East

    ‘Clear-eyed and often shrewd analysis of the huge political and social changes in Lebanon wrought by the Hariri assassination in 2005. Indispensable even for those who think they know the country well.’ — Roger Owen, A. J. Meyer Professor of Middle East History, Harvard University

    ‘They say that if you think you understand Lebanon you haven’t been studying it long enough. This book provides a shortcut. It is a must-read if you wish to understand today’s reality in this complex, fascinating and ever-attractive country.  From community power-sharing to corporate consociationalism, from the state of the army to the image-making around the late Rafiq Hariri, a wide range of topics are covered in great depth.’ — Frances Guy, British Ambassador to Beirut,  2006 – 2011

    ‘The book begins with a concise and informative summary by the co-editor Michael Kerr …overall there is a deft balance between scholarly discourse and the personal observation of an insider.’ – Times Literary Supplement

    ‘Compiled and edited with care, this timely volume is essential for anyone wishing to understand the complex eddies of contemporary Lebanon, showcasing true regional expertise without ever abandoning objectivity or critical independence.  As a work that explains the intricacies of Lebanese politics post-Hariri with clarity and precision, this cannot be surpassed.’ — Clive Jones, Chair of Middle East Studies and International Politics, University of Leeds

    ‘The expert contributions to this sophisticated volume address the tumultuous politics of post-2005 Lebanon. This is a valiant effort to throw light on the complexity of the country’s conflicts, its diverse internal identities and commonalities, its power-sharing arrangements and their intricate connections to regional and international actors and processes. The authors carefully trace the continuities from and ruptures with the country’s previous history. This is academia at its best, balancing empirical detail with conceptual sophistication and bringing together various disciplinary perspectives.’ — Katerina Dalacoura, Senior Lecturer in International Relations, London School of Economics

    ‘This book presents astute critical readings of post-“Cedar Revolution” Lebanon. Its interdisciplinary analysis of contemporary Lebanese history and politics offers an excellent overview of the on-going struggle over powersharing, state security, economic revitalisation and the post-war recovery.’ –– Craig Larkin, University of Exeter

    ‘Lebanon After the Cedar Revolution is indispensable reading not only for those seeking to understand how seemingly ungovernable fractious identities can be governed, and indeed can thrive. This is an exhaustive, sophisticated, and unique reference book on Lebanon as a window to the Levant, and to the feuding identities of the Middle East at large. It is a lucid, illuminating compilation that offers much needed catharsis and relief from a body of traditional analyses and interpretations of the region that often fall short, and mislead more than illuminate.’ — The Levantine Review

    ‘In eleven excellent and richly sourced essays, the authors of this volume dissect how and why [sectarian conflict] has been the dismal outcome of what was supposed to be a ‘revolution’. Although their work does not make for comfortable reading, they present what is probably the best-informed and documented analysis of this hapless country’s politics for over a decade.’ — International Affairs

    Paperback / October 2012 / 9781849042499 / 256pp

    20,00
  • Migrant, Refugee, Smuggler, Saviour

    Tinti, Peter

    Migrant, Refugee, Smuggler, Saviour investigates one of the most under-examined aspects of the great migration crisis of our time. As millions seek passage to Europe in order to escape conflicts, repressive governments and poverty, their movements are enabled and actively encouraged by professional criminal networks that earn billions of dollars.

    Many of these smugglers carry out their activities with little regard for human rights, which has led to a manifold increase in human suffering, not only in the Mediterranean Sea, but also along the overland smuggling routes that cross the Sahara, penetrate deep into the Balkans, and into hidden corners of Europe’s capitals. But others are revered as saviours by those that they move, for it is they who deliver men, women and children to a safer place and better life. Disconcertingly, it is often criminals who help the most desperate among us when the international system turns them away.

    This book is a measured attempt, born of years of research and reporting in the field, to better understand how people-smuggling networks function, the ways in which they have evolved, and what they mean for peace and security in the future.

    20,00
  • Qatar

    David B. Roberts

    Rarely has a state changed its character so completely in so short a period of time. Previously content to play a role befitting its small size, Qatar was a traditional, risk-averse Gulf monarchy until the early 1990s.

    A bloodless coup in 1995 brought to power an emerging elite with a progressive vision for the future. Financed by gas exports and protected by a US security umbrella, Qatar diversified its foreign relations to include Iran and Israel, established the satellite broadcaster Al Jazeera, assumed a leading role in international mediation, and hosted a number of top-level sporting tournaments, culminating in the successful FIFA World Cup 2022 bid.

    Qatar’s disparate, often misunderstood, policies coalesce to propagate a distinct brand. Whether to counter regional economic competitors or to further tie Qatar to the economies of the world’s leading countries, this brand is designed innovatively to counter a range of security concerns; in short, Qatar is diversifying its dependencies.

    Qatar’s prominent role in the Arab Spring follows a similar pattern, yet the gamble it is taking in supporting Islamists and ousting dictators is potentially dangerous: not only is it at risk from ‘blowback’ in dealing with such actors, but a lack of transparency means that clichés and assumptions threaten to derail ‘brand Qatar’.

    Author

    David B Roberts joined the Defence Studies Department at King’s College London in October 2013 and is based at the Royal College of Defence Studies (RCDS). He was previously the Director of the Qatar office of the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies (RUSI Qatar). He was awarded a PhD by the University of Durham for a thesis examining Qatar’s foreign policy

    Reviews

    Qatar and the Arab Spring is a compelling, well written analysis of one of the more remarkable sagas in Gulf politics: the rise to regional and global prominence of the State of Qatar. It aims to explain how and why Qatar used the Arab Uprisings as an “opportunity to be seized rather than a challenge to be contained.” This accessible yet theoretically and empirically rich book should be read by anyone with an interest in the Gulf.’ — Frederic Wehrey, Senior Associate in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and author of Sectarian Politics in the Gulf: From the Iraq War to the Arab Uprisings

    ‘Clichéd as it may sound, there has never been a better time to publish a book on Qatar. With the heady do-no-wrong boom years firmly behind it, Qatar now seems caught in a web of international intrigue, proxy wars, and counter-espionage. Ulrichsen’s latest is an excellent primer as we wait and watch events unfold.’ — Christopher Davidson, reader in Middle East politics at the School of Government and International Affairs, Durham University and author of After the Sheikhs: The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies

    ‘This is an ambitious and original attempt to describe, assess and explain the Qatar phenomenon by examining the country’s policies in the context of an overall strategy of regime and state security, including “branding”. It adds very considerably to the literature, which remains thin on the ground when it comes to Qatar, and makes a compelling, well-structured case.’ — Gerd Nonneman, Dean of Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Qatar

    ‘This book is a revelation: it provides a sophisticated and long overdue examination of the spectrum of Qatar’s foreign relations, and how the tiny state is seeking to carve an oversized place in the regional and global international order. A great many readers will find much of use herein: for scholars, the book is a unique contribution to the debate about Middle Eastern foreign relations, state “branding”, and the role of institutions such as media – the author dwells in some depth on Al-Jazeera, for example – while for practitioners, businesspeople, and others, the book shines a light on, and does much to explain, the complexities of this tiny but highly-influential state.’ — Matthew Gray, Professor of Public Policy at the Australian National University and Director of the ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods

    Hardback / January 2017 / 9781849043250 / 356pp

    32,00
  • Quicksilver War

    William Harris

    Quicksilver War is a panoramic political history of the wars that coursed through Syria and Iraq in the wake of the ‘Arab Spring’ and eventually merged to become a regional catastrophe: a kaleidoscopic and constantly shifting conflict involving many different parties and phases.

    William Harris distils the highly complex dynamics behind the conflict, starting with the brutalising Baathist regimes in Damascus and Baghdad. He charts the malignant consequences of incompetent US occupation of Iraq and Bashar al-Assad’s self-righteous mismanagement of Syria, through the implosion of Syria, and the emergence of eastern and western theatres of war focused respectively on future control of Syria and the challenge of ISIS. Beyond the immediate arena of conflict, geopolitical riptides have also been set in motion, including Turkey’s embroilment in the war and the shifting circumstances of the Kurds. This sweeping history addresses urgent questions for our time. Will the world rubber-stamp and bankroll the Russian-led ‘solution’ in Syria, backed by Turkey and Iran? Is the ‘Quicksilver War’ about to reach an explosive finale? Or will ongoing political manoeuvring mutate into years of further violence?

    William Harris is Professor of Politics at the University of Otago, New Zealand

    Author

    William Harris is Professor of Politics at the University of Otago, New Zealand. He works on the politics and history of the Levant states. His most recent books are Lebanon: A History, 600-2011 and the fourth, completely revised edition of The Levant: A Fractured Mosaic. William has written four sole-authored books on Middle Eastern affairs as well as variety of book chapters and academic article, principally on the politics and history of the Levant states. In recent years his work has concentrated on Lebanon and Syria. His latest book is Lebanon: A History, 600-2011 for Oxford University Press in New York (2012). His previous book, The Levant: A Fractured Mosaic (Markus Wiener, Princeton, 2003 and 2005) won an Outstanding Academic Title award from Choice Magazine in the United States. Research and teaching interests include: the politics and history of the Levant states and Turkey; Middle East comparative politics; and the international affairs of the Middle East.

    Reviews

    ‘Combining factual breadth with analytical depth, this fine account of the Syrian and Iraqi conflicts manages to highlight both their intertwined character and key differences between the two countries’ respective history and internal dynamics. It also challenges short-term explanations of the current fragmentation by showing how decades of Ba’thist rules have paved the way for it.’ — Thomas Pierret, Senior Lecturer in Contemporary Islam, University of Edinburgh

    ‘The strength of Quicksilver War lies in showing the dialectical interplay between domestic political authoritarianism, fierce geostrategic rivalries and  constant foreign intervention. It fills a major gap in the field.’ — Fawaz A. Gerges, Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics, and author of ISIS: A History 

    ‘A masterful book. William Harris is a veteran observer of the Fertile Crescent, and a particularly perceptive analyst. He offers a balanced and nuanced view of how Iraq and Syria descended into violence, instability and suffering at the hands of competing domestic, regional and international actors. In treating Iraq and Syria as a combined war Harris offers a better understanding of the complexities and the challenges awaiting both countries before a modicum of stability can be found.’ — Kemal Kirisci, TUSIAD Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, and author of Turkey and the West: Fault Lines in a Troubled Alliance

    ‘William Harris artfully sketches the trajectory of Syria and Iraq — two core states of the Arab world, whose geography and history made them key to the understanding of the region’s past as well as its future — from stability and solidity under the dictatorships of Saddam Hussein and the Assad dynasty to civil war and Jihad.’ — Eyal Zisser, Vice Rector of Tel Aviv University and Yona and Dina Ettinger Chair in the Contemporary History of the Middle East

    Hardback / January 2018 / 9781849048682 / 240pp

    27,00
  • Rebel Law

    Frank Ledwidge

     

    In most societies, courts are where the rubber of government meets the road of the people. If a state cannot settle disputes and enforce its decisions, to all intents and purposes it is no longer in charge. This is why successful rebels put courts and justice at the top of their agendas. Rebel Law explores this key weapon in the arsenal of insurgent groups, from the IRA’s ‘Republican Tribunals’ of the 1920s to Islamic State’s ‘Caliphate of Law’, via the ALN in Algeria of the ‘50s and 60s and the Afghan Taliban of recent years.

    Frank Ledwidge delineates the battle in such ungoverned spaces between counterinsurgents seeking to retain the initiative and the insurgent courts undermining them. Contrasting colonial judicial strategy with the chaos of stabilisation operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, he offers compelling lessons for today’s conflicts.

    Author

    Frank Ledwidge is a former barrister and military intelligence officer who served in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya. His books include Losing Small Wars: British Military Failure in Iraq and Afghanistan (2011) and Investment in Blood: The True Cost of Britain’s Afghan War (2013).

    Reviews

    ‘As a former justice advisor for the UK military mission in Afghanistan, Ledwidge brings a uniquely well-informed perspective to the issues of using legal processes to achieve military objectives by both insurgents and counterinsurgents at the operational and tactical level. He argues that the ability of insurgents to offer “fair” judicial process — particularly dispute resolution — has proved critical to successful state-building by insurgent groups. On the flipside, Ledwidge contends that counterinsurgency strategy must employ “legal pluralism” to develop an effective judicial strategy. Cogently written and forcefully argued, Rebel Law will be of interest to military professionals, legal scholars and policy makers alike.’ — Montgomery McFate, Professor at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, and author of Military Anthropology: Soldiers, Scholars and Subjects at the Margins of Empire

    ‘Frank Ledwidge builds a compelling case for the monopoly of justice in determining the outcome of insurgencies. Drawing upon years of experience and scholarship, Ledwidge convincingly argues that nowhere is the contest for control of a population, the delicate interplay between consent and coercion, expressed with greater impact than in the competing legal systems offered by insurgent and counter-insurgent.’ — Edward Burke, Lecturer in Strategic Studies, The University of Portsmouth, Royal Air Force College Cranwell

    ‘This book is an essential resource for scholars and practitioners concerned with the operation of legal systems during and after conflict. Frank Ledwidge offers a unique perspective on the complex interactions between state and insurgent judiciaries that is informed by years of fieldwork and service as a justice advisor in warscapes including Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya.’ — Mara Revkin, Department of Political Science, Yale University

    ‘In the literature on counterinsurgency no concepts are more frequently invoked or more poorly understood than legitimacy, justice, and law. Insurgencies win by out-governing the status quo power and the primary thrust of their strategy is nearly always the provision of alternative justice to populations hungry for better law. Frank Ledwidge’s brilliant book plugs the gap in the literature commendably. It is indispensable reading.’ — David Betz, Professor of War in the Modern World, Department of War Studies, King’s College London

    ‘A ground-breaking picture of the role of law in (particularly, irregular) warfare: so-called lawfare. This highly readable study opens up a new vista in counterinsurgency and underlines the centrality therein of properly-delivered, culturally-specific justice. A fascinating tour de force that demands to be read by politicians and generals alike.’ —  Mike Martin, author of An Intimate War: An Oral History of the Helmand Conflict

    Hardback
    April 2017 • 9781849047982 • 256pp

    30,00